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Outlaw God

Out of curiosity tell more of DJ Short Genetics please?

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I love Sannie genetics the best and slowly falling in love with Killing Fields and the beautiful growth of Sannie Jack.

But out of curiosity can someone tell more of DJ Short Genetics please?

I did a search of "DJ Short' and it comes up with nothing

Sorry, an error occurred. If you are unsure on how to use a feature, or don't know why you got this error message, try looking through the help files for more information.

 

The error returned was:

One or all of your search keywords were below 4 characters or you searched for words which are not allowed, such as 'html', 'img', etc, please go back and increase the length of these search keywords or choose different keywords.

 

Are these bogus seeds from hempDepot also like Attitude in another thread?

DJ Short Blueberry

DJ Short Cocoa Kush

DJ Short F13

DJ Short Flo

DJ Short Grape Krush

DJ Short True Blueberry

 

Thanks

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DJ short is one of the few "respected" breeders for his work for the canna comunity's

He has some kick ass strains

 

There are DJ short genetics in sannie seeds and breeders choice seeds

 

This dude have made some real deal blue crosses :)

 

greetz sannie

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DJ short is one of the few "respected" breeders for his work for the canna comunity's

He has some kick ass strains

 

There are DJ short genetics in sannie seeds and breeders choice seeds

 

This dude have made some real deal blue crosses :)

 

greetz sannie

 

 

That's great to know, thanks very much! :)

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Sanne is right on the money. DJ short is the only Breeder beside Sannie to be completely transparent about his process. He was one of the last to have large fields to work with and invented Blueberry from scratch using Juicy Fruit Thai, Highland Oaxacan Gold and something I can't remember. Took 7 years I believe to get true breeding parents. He's got a chart with the process.

I've ordered only from Legends in Canada.

The Breeder Chimera is close to him and breeds with some of his parents. Breeder Steve from Spice of Life appears to be retired.

 

I smoked some Cocoa Kush outdoor organic and it was some of the best weed Ive ever smoked.

 

When I have time, I'll cut and paste several articles from DJ on breeding. Informative reads.

 

My favorite smoke is a blueberry (sativa pheno) from DJ which is floral in smell ( the smoke

smells like gardenias) and berry intaste.

 

What fascinates me about Madonna and Jackberry is that they seem to be in this floral ,better yielding family of Blueberry.

When I smoke that Bb, even friends who don't smoke say: That smells so nice! It doesn't smell like pot, it smells like flowers.

 

Flo is short for floral and also expresses this quality. Besides the fact that I have mores

seeds than I could grow , the price tag keeps me from ordering cocoa kush.($150.00 )If esco's work with the cocoa is more

affordable , that would be great for me.

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When I have time, I'll cut and paste several articles from DJ on breeding. Informative reads.

 

Here

 

My Cataloguing System

 

c. 2004 DJ Short

 

Perhaps one of the most useful devices used in a quality cannabis breeding project is that of catalogue techniques. This refers to the method used to categorize various traits for future reference, or how to best label traits from a given population. It is also a means to track who came from where (generational references).

 

First and foremost, I cannot begin to describe the level of complexity involved with a breeding project that extends from the f-2 to the f-5 range. It took me over a decade and a half of trial and much error to fully comprehend and develop a system that actually works to this level and beyond. It starts out simple enough, until the f-2's, then the complexity expands exponentially with each generation.

 

The P-1's are simple enough, they are the original breed-stock and labeled for what they are, i.e. Highland, Purple or Chocolate Thai, Oaxacan or Santa Marta Gold, Pure Afghan, etc. The f-1's were equally simple as they were of uniform expressions and I simply chose to label them “The Cross”. The f-2 generation was equally easy to identify with the label “Double Cross”, or the progeny of the f-1 cross. However, when the f-2's were grown out, extreme diversity ruled the making of the f-3's (or the descriptions of the f-2's selected to breed further with) a tougher call to make.

 

It is at this level (and beyond) that some form of labeling system becomes necessary to catalogue all of the different variations found. Beginning with the plants grown out from the f-2 seeds I chose to utilize an alphabetized system with each letter corresponding to a specific trait. For example, the letter “B” came to signify the “Berry” characteristic, “F” stands for “Fruity” (sometimes “Floral“), “G” is for Grape, “C” for Citrus, “O” for orange, “L” for lemon or lime, “K” equaled “Kush”, “S” for “Sativa” “P” for Purple, “X” for extreme glandular trichome production, etc.

 

I must confess that it took much trial and error to finally get it right. Therefore, if one were to look at my early notes many exceptions to what developed as “the rule” can be found. I left these early “mistakes” as they were so as not to over-complicate what came next. It is also very important to note that most of these observations were relatively subjective and that no more than two traits, or characteristics were ever assigned to any one plant. Therefore, the label “BK” came to stand for “Berry Kush”, or a Kush dominant plant with outstanding berry attributes. It is also important to note that only the most outstanding plant of any given attribute was selected for future work. So the plant that ended up with the “BK” label was the most Berry-Kush of the lot.

 

So, my f-3 stock became labeled with a two-letter code indicating what the most outstanding characteristics of it’s parent (primarily mother) were, and only those with the strongest expressions earned their label. When the f-3's were grown out and crossed to make the f-4 generation, these labels were coupled to indicate the parents of the f-4 progeny, i.e. BK/FS would be a cross between an f-3 Berry-Kush mother (I always list the female first, male second with a back-slash in between) and an f-3 Fruity Sativa father.

 

F-4's and Beyond

 

Consider the label number: 4/5 3 96-2. This is the type of numbering symbol I use to label F-4 and beyond plants. Before we dissect this number I need to point out a few rules that I follow in a breeding project beyond the F-4 generation.

 

First, I only grow out no more than six varieties at any single time. The reason is to avoid too much confusion. Six is about the maximum number of varieties an individual can realistically keep track of. These six (or five, or four etc.) varieties are then labeled as “1" through “6" (or the number of varieties used). Let’s say the 6 f-3's I use are: 1. “FK/FK”, 2. “BK/PK”, 3. “FK/FL”, 4. “GK/GK”, 5. “PK/FP” and 6. “XP/FK”. Notes are made to record this fact and the seeds are then sprouted and grown using these simple, single digit identification numbers (1 through 6 in this example).

 

Second, I select only one male from any single breeding project. Again, this simplifies things and avoids mistakes enormously. That male is generally selected at about the third week in the flowering cycle, unless it is a clone from another project. After the single male is selected the other males are removed and the remaining females are numbered according to their variety category (i.e. if there are seven #1. females, five #2 females, etc. they are labeled #1–1 through 7, #2–1 through 5, etc.) The male simply retains the number from its variety label, in our above example the number “5" (in the 4/5), or the “PK/FP” male.

 

Now we may examine the above example: 4/5 3 96-2. The first two numbers, “4/5" are the variety number of the female first and male second. So in this case that would be: a “GK/GK” female crossed with the “PK/FP” male. The third number in our example, “3" means female #3 from the #4 (“GK/GK”) batch. The next number in the example, “96" is merely the year and the final number is the crop number for that year. So, translated, the number 4/5 3 96-2 is the third “GK/GK” (or #4) female crossed with the “PK/FP” (or #5) male grown from the second crop of 1996.

 

Please note that the “/5” male-used indicator will be /5 for all of the seeds labeled from this batch as the #5 (“PK/FP”) male is the only one used. If a male clone from a past crop is used it may be indicated by using the #7 in the initial notes (if six varieties are sprouted) and described as the male-clone-used in the #7 description. Likewise, if any of the six varieties tested are from a past clone (female), they may be selected as one of the #1 through #6 varieties, labeled and described accordingly.

 

It seems complex at first, but I assure you that it works great. The same system is used for the F-5 generation, and beyond. The system merely requires that dated notes be kept and catalogued. That way, any crosses may be backtracked and referenced via one’s notes and a simple, six or seven digit code is all that is needed to label and catalogue one’s plants.

 

Finally, this system works best for forward crosses mainly. Backcrosses will need another connotation to note their use . The “clone-used” labeling described prior works well for backcrosses involving clones.

 

This system is good for only one grow out at a time. If multiple grows, or facilities are used then they will need to be noted as well, perhaps with a lettered “A”, “B”, “C” etc. appended onto the catalogue number. Also, detailed notes of each individual plant are necessary to fully utilize any cataloguing system and are obviously required for success. Other than that, I have found this to be a relatively simple and foolproof system for cataloguing one’s breeding projects beyond the f-3 generation.

 

 

 

Background, Review and DJ’s Law

 

Remember; all of my seed-stock came from the cross of two distinctly different P1 parents with the mother being of pure, land-race sativa origin and the father being a pure indica. This cross produced a very uniform line I’ve referred to as “The Cross”, or f1 generation. When “The Cross” was bred with itself (dubbed “Double Cross” at the time) the resulting variance was phenomenal in the f2 generation expressions. Beginning with this f2 generation, intense scrutiny and application of the selection rules and laws come into play. The bulk of the variation from this f2 generation were primarily discovered in the 1980's.

 

I must comment here that the variation witnessed from this f2 cross, and subsequent crosses, was truly amazing in its complexity of variance. I also need to mention the fact that, as far as “the number’s game” is concerned (selecting from as large a population as possible), this f2, and to some degree the f3 generations are the most relevant. That is, the larger the number of f2's and f3's sprouted, the greater the degree of variance that is witnessed. It is from the f3 and beyond generations that specific traits are bred for and stabilized. Once a specific trait is recognized, the numbers necessary for success diminish with each generation successfully crossed toward the desired traits. In simple terms; the more f2's and f3's sprouted for examination the better. However, once a specific trait presents itself and is chosen for future work and appears to breed true through subsequent generation, the less f4's, f5's etc. that are needed to witness the desired results.

 

 

 

There is one very simple rule that I feel is primary when considering one’s involvement in a quality cannabis breeding project, or when applying Luther Burbank’s law (“Select the best and reject all others.”). It is an extension of Luther Burbank’s Law that I will refer to as:

 

DJ’s Law of Quality Cannabis Breeding.

 

“The progeny must equal or surpass its parent in overall quality and desirability to be considered for future breeding.”

 

That is, if the progeny is not as good as the bud it came from, it is rejected from further breeding. The finished product from the grown seed does not need to be exactly like the bud or parent from which it came. A good example is from the land-race Thai and the plants grown from its seed. The plants grown from the land-race Thai seed, especially produced indoors, were not much like the imported Thai from which it came (primarily due in this case to very different growing environments and curing techniques). It was, however, very equal, and in some instances superior to the buds from which it came and therefore worthy of consideration.

 

On the other hand, I have not had much luck in equaling the effects of certain tropical Island herbs such as Hawaiian or Jamaican indoors, and therefore these offerings never made the grade. For the record, the majority of land-race varieties grown out prove to fail DJ’s law, IMHO. Very few end up being of significant value or worthy of future consideration. But DJ’s law also applies to the selection of the f2's, f3's and beyond.

 

I realize that it is sometimes impossible in the current seed market to be able to sample a true example of the bud (parent) of the seed one purchases. Sometimes these varieties are commercially available in places such as a Dutch coffee shop, but one is never really certain if the bud one is purchasing (or the seed for that matter) is the real deal. This is perhaps one of the main flaws in the current seed market–reliability. Given this situation, the seed buyer and breeder will need to employ Luther Burbank’s Law first, and DJ’s Law after a parent is created for testing.

 

A Word About Mutagens

 

I am aware of concerns involving mutagens such as colchicine and their possible use on cannabis plants. Colchicine is a chemical that when applied to seeds or sprouts can cause extreme genetic mutations in future generations of the seeds that survive the treatment (often less that 1%). For the record let me state that I have never used colchicine, or any other mutagen, in my breeding work . All of my selections are from organically produced crops. I do have my suspicions, however, primarily concerning some of the Thai strains that I have used.

 

I am not certain, but I suspect that the Highland and Chocolate Thai may have been the results of a mutagenic regimen. The reasons I make the speculation is due to observations witnessed in the growing cycle of the Highland and Chocolate Thai and their progeny. Both were extremely “freakish” in some of their expressions, as were a number of subsequent generations. These freakish anomalies are similar to many of the abnormalities documented by mutagenic experiments published in journals such as High Times and Cannabis Culture. These abnormalities include asymmetric growth patterns, “albino” mutations that affect parts of the plant such as half of a leaf, various polyploid expressions and mild to extreme leaf mutations. I am very interested to learn about any first hand experience anyone may have had in this capacity. Having said that, one of the most important aspects to consider in regard to a breeding regimen is that of ratios.

 

Ratios

 

The math for this selection process involves watching the ratios of desirable plants from f2 to f3 and beyond generations. The ratio of plants exhibiting a specifically desired trait from the f2 generation may be 1:20 or 1:50 or 1:100 or even as high as 1:1000 (approximate ratios). Once obtained and selected, however, and crossed to the correct pollen source, this ratio will equate more and more per each successful generational cross. This is another indicator of which individuals actually breed true for the specific desired trait(s). Therefore, if the ratio of plants with desired traits presents itself in an approximate 1:100 ratio in the f2 generation, and successful crosses are made, this ratio should diminish to between 1:50 to 1:20 for the same desired trait in the f3 generation. If the cross remains successful, the ratio will diminish to anywhere from 1:10 to an absolute IBL (In-Bred Line) beyond the f4 cross of 1:2 (or 1:1 barring male sexual exclusion, i.e. the ratio among the female plants only).

 

 

 

It is important to note that any 1:2 (1:1 female) IBL ratio is generally for a very specific, singular trait. When considering combinations of traits, the best obtainable ratio I have found is between 1:5 to approximately 1:10, depending on the number of desired traits sought. Please note that these ratio numbers are approximate and the true numbers may be closer to the powers of two such as 1:8, 1:16, 1:32 etc. It also needs to be noted that my ratios relate to total number of seeds sprouted and not just the number of female plants.

 

Therefore, if I sprout 100 f2 seeds and find one female plant with any number of desirable qualities, and I successfully find a male f2 pollen donor to cross with, and the ratio of these same desirable plants in the f3 generation becomes at least 1:50 (preferably 1:30 or better) then I consider myself on the right track and proceed from there. If a subsequent cross of the f3's provides a ratio of desirability in the f4's of 1:20 (or closer), I am definitely on the right track. In essence these are the (general) numbers I look for in the early breeding trials. Suffice it to say that my informal observations have proven true enough for me to be able to judge desirable results with adequate success, despite the approximations.

 

Suffice it also to say that I have a large collection of f3's and f4's and beyond that merit further investigation. These f4's (and some f3's and f5's) are the primary source for all future breeding work along the lines established by the ratios of plants with the desirable traits expressed therein.

 

A Word About Anomalies

 

Anomalies, individuals that are markedly different from the general phenotypic expression of a given variety, are rare, but occur with a near predictable ratio. Beyond the f-3 generation (and from my personal seed-stock) anomalies present themselves at the ratio of approximately 1:100. Because there are both positive (desirable) and negative (non-desirable) anomalies, the overall ratio of positive (desirable) anomalies is probably somewhere in the neighborhood of approx. 1:200. Desirable anomalies are very valuable to cannabis breeding providing that they are viable. So always keep an eye out for desirable anomalies and put sufficient energy into their reproduction. More often than not however, anomalies can be very finicky and therefore difficult to work with

 

Past Selection Processes Review

 

Originally, in the late 1970's, I was growing up to 100 plants at a time using over 1000 watts of light, and also outdoors in a backyard garden space. These were all land race sativa that fortunately cloned well. The ratio of highly desirable individuals from these plants was about 1:100. One of the most annoying traits of these varieties was hermaphroditism. Approximately 60% of all of these plants from seed were unmanageable hermis, and about 25% more were what I referred to as manageable hermaphrodites, meaning that with close observation and intense scrutiny the male pods could be seen and eliminated as they appeared. About 15% of these sativa plants were female enough to produce marketable sinsimilla bud, with a constant vigilance toward the occasional stray pollen sack. In other words the hermaphroditism expressed in these equatorial sativa was extreme and nearly total.

 

A quick word about the virtues of hermaphrodites: Ask any old-time herbalist, one who has been experiencing fine herb since at least the early 1970's, what their favorite all-time herbal variety was, and the answer will be something to the effect of; “Santa Marta or Acapulco Gold” or “Highland or Chocolate Thai” or “Punta Roya (red-tipped gold Highland Oaxacan)” or “Guerran Green” or “Panama Red” etc. et. al., all of which were equatorial, or sub-tropical, origin sativa and hermaphroditic. Even the great hashish of the era such as Lebanese Red and Blonde, all Moroccan and Nepalese were produced from seeded stock.

 

This is not so much in praise of the hermaphrodite as it is a suggestion in regard to the cannabinoid profile of seeded verses non-seeded herb. It has been my experience that the cannabinoid profile of seeded herb produces a wider range of effect than from non-seeded, or sinsimilla, herb. The equatorial environment also probably contributed to a wider range of cannabinoids. One of the aspects of the equatorial environment is its consistent day/night temperature range, there is little difference between day and night temps on the equator supposedly inspiring a wider cannabinoid profile. Couple this with the seeded cannabinoid profile and it becomes easy to understand the popularity of the equatorial produced sativa, despite its hermaphroditic problems. I am curios as to what future research in this capacity may provide.

 

Once the indica was introduced into the mix the hermaphrodite “problem” became controllable. It only takes a few zero-tolerance generations indoors to fully eliminate hermaphroditic tendencies. As a matter of fact, this, coupled with shortening the flowering cycle, became the first main concerns of the indoor or commercial horticulturist. This unbalanced focus may be the strongest contributing factor to the “blandness” of much of the herb to follow. The author “R” did a cover piece for High Times magazine in the mid-1980's calling for a “Ban the Bud” campaign, against the indica onslought, due to how bad and bland the quality of some herb was becoming then. I remember the times clearly.

 

During this period I was beginning to venture out into larger satellite grows (indoor and out) that kicked my selection numbers up to around 1000 plants at a time for awhile. It was from these trials that I was able to do the bulk of my f2 experimentation and selections. I worked with these numbers for enough trials to manipulate and witness the phenomenon of quality production to a high degree of certainty. Once I was certain how to produce the f3's, the f4's and beyond became much easier to produce.

 

During the late 1980's, and due to the harsh political realities of the times, the high numbers game became too dangerous. The war on some drugs and spooky ops such as Operation Green Merchant forced my experimentation deep underground. Fortunately, the lessons learned prior proved fruitful and progress was possible despite the political weather. I had already learned to produce f3 and f4 Blueberry (et. al.). However, doing so with diminished numbers actually helped boost my learning curve. Between 1987 to 1990 I was able to do so using less than 100 plants from seed at a time. And by 1991 I was able to do adequate selection work from past produced stock using less than 50 plants (seeds) at a time.

 

 

Europe

 

Holland

 

By the early 1990's I was extremely interested in the burgeoning seed market developing in Holland. I had known about the seed banks since 1983 and was always only interested in obtaining more pure, land-race varieties. Unfortunately, there were only hybrid crosses ever available at the time and I had more than enough of my own to work with. By 1993 I finally made the pilgrimage to Amsterdam where I made new connections. In 1994 I connected with the first company that I worked with in Europe. By 1995 I was supplying this company with seed-stock both for sale and for breed work. I had contracted with this company to produce Blueberry, Flo and Blue Velvet.

 

The first company I worked with in Europe sprouted only 25 seeds of each of these varieties to make selections from. Other than supplying seed-stock, I was only minimally involved in the selection process. I did get to see the mother and father plants alive, however, the selection process had already been done prior by others. Unfortunately, my relationship with this company was short-lived as all the owner really wanted was my seed-stock. Once he had it I became a very low priority in his scheme. In all honesty I was never paid one red cent for any of the Blueberry (or “Flow” or Blue Velvet) that company number one in Europe produced (plus having over 3,000 seeds that I produced completely ripped off).

 

Needless to say this lack of concern prompted me to seek other possibilities that culminated in my relationship with the second company I worked with in Europe. At this company about 50 seeds of each variety were sprouted, but I was once again mainly left out of the selection process except for sampling a number of finished products and making selections based on those (which is enough, actually). I never got to see any of the live plants from this selection process at company number two in Europe. I also contributed seed-stock for three more varieties there; Blue Moonshine, Blue Heaven and Purple Passion. The owner of this company was satisfied with paying me the minimum amount I would consider adequate. Fortunately, part of the deal was my ability to remain independent and work with whomever else I pleased.

 

Switzerland

 

The third company I worked with in Europe was in Switzerland. The owner of this company was able to dramatically push the envelope there and some interesting results blossomed. I visited Switzerland three times between 1999 and 2001 and was truly amazed at what I witnessed on each visit. Out of all of the companies that I worked with in Europe, I felt the most involved and productive in Switzerland. I was involved with selections of finished products and with live mother and father plants as well. I even got to help plant, transplant and harvest a few of the gems produced there.

 

The varieties produced by the third company that I worked with in Europe included Moonshine Rocket Fuel, Rosebud and Blue Satellite. I must admit that the bubble hash from the Blue Satellite is among the finest and most desirable product I have sampled (outside of my own) since the 1980's! Unfortunately, the owner of this company was unable to successfully work with the local authorities and was forced to leave Switzerland. Some truly intrepid tales were spun during the brief stay there and I will remember many of them with delight.

 

Canada, The True North Strong and Free

 

With glimmers of hope on the horizon, Canada is fast becoming the Cannabis Breeding capital of the world. With the much-appreciated activism of entrepreneurs such as Marc Emery (et. al.), a new haven for a seriously dedicated cannabis community is developing. One such entrepreneurial dedicate is Red of Legends Seeds. I met Red in Switzerland where he was very busy and involved working for the happening community there. Red is a high-flying, free spirit with a savvy sense of taste.

 

Red was able to orchestrate the necessary requirements to produce a very large selection process. This grow consisted of about 400 plants (over 200 Blueberry phenos and over 100 Flo). Out of these there ended up being over 160 Blueberry and over 70 Flo females and about 60 males that made the initial cut. Copies of each of these were cloned and meticulously maintained by the crew. This actually turned out to be a slight overkill, but a testimony to the absolute dedication of the crew.

 

The Crew

 

Mighty-G is a green-thumbed master gardener whose success with cannabis is phenomenal. Mr. G was able to provide and maintain a near-perfect growing environment for a lengthy period of time as the plants were kept in an extended vegetive state to insure 100% clone success. The plants were absolutely beautiful. Kermit was in charge of clone reproduction and maintenance. Kermit has been a respected part of the local cannabis community for many years. Chimera appeared online a few years ago and has proven himself to be an intelligent and dedicated soul, along with being a focused horticulturist with excellent credentials in the field of genetics. I first learned of Chimera online where he posted to a few message boards that I occasionally lurk and I appreciated the information he shared. The Cannabis Cowboy also added his expertise, especially considering the collection, purification and pressing of the dry-sieved resin.

 

I just want to give a big “shout out” and a huge thank you to all of the crew for their very successful efforts on this project. You cats rock! Thank you.

 

The Process

 

The main room was divided in two with the Blueberry on the left and the Flo on the right. The plants were relatively huge considering how long they’d been in veg. Lush growth dominated as three distinct Blueberry phenotypes and two distinct Flo presented their development, along with a small number of unique anomalies. Of course, all individuals were numbered and labeled and notes were made over the course of several inspections during the flowering cycle.

 

During this period all of the males were isolated in a separate room and watched closely to enable the best selection from them. From this particular gene-pool, I find it relatively easy to select the best males as they tend to express their traits regardless of environment or light cycle. There were so many to choose from during this process that the difficulty became who to cull out. Most of the males were at least to some degree resinous with glandular stalked trichome, some more than others. This usually makes it easy to test certain profiles such as overall flavors.

 

Only after the most desirable males are selected (i.e. all the others rejected) are issues of structure and growth pattern considered. Sweet, fruity and floral expressions are most desirable, but attention is paid to other possibilities as well. Top quality candidates of indica, sativa and mutant anomaly are picked by process of elimination. Then those with the best structure; hollow stems, good color and flower density, become the final candidates.

 

The females also pose the same problem in regard to who is eliminated. Notes are made as to any outstanding qualifications that present themselves during the bud cycle. But it is not until the sixth week in flower, and sometimes not until the eighth week (or longer if the variety is strongly sativa), that the real differences in individuals becomes apparent and the truly amazing qualities shine. And even then, it only amounts to field-notes until well after harvest and the cut-and-dried product is totally cured. It is then that the final selection process begins.

 

During our selection-crop numerous individuals could have passed the requirements to be a great mother plant. By and large, the overall ratio of desirable plants that qualified for final selection from this crop was approximately 1:10 (employing DJ’s Law). As it turns out the elite ratio of final candidates turned out to be approximately 1:30–the best of the best as it were. By the eighth week in bud approximately two dozen individuals stood out as primary candidates. After these samples were individually labeled and jar cured for about two months, a total of eleven were of supreme quality. Believe it or not, the final elimination process among these eleven was perhaps the most difficult to complete. Part of the sprocess involved selecting one of each of the three Blueberry phenotypes, one of the Flo, one Blue Moonshine and deciding on the possibility of something new.

 

 

 

The Varieties

 

After the fourth week in bud, generally speaking, certain characteristics become apparent. On the Blueberry side of the room three distinct phenotypes presented themselves, while on the flo side two less distinct phenos appeared. The three Blueberry phenotypes could be referred to as indica, sativa and variegated or mutated. The indica were shorter, denser and had larger calyx and bract leafs making the buds look plump. The sativa were taller, more slender leafed with more elongated buds of dense, smaller calyx. The indica tended to be of a stronger, more musky odor where the sativa were more delicate and floral. The variegated or mutated individuals varied more in their aromatic palate with some seeming more potent than others. On the flo side the difference was less pronounced between phenotypes but two distinct types developed. The primary difference was in bud structure and formation with one type growing with its bract leaves pointing more up and the other with its bract leaves pointing down. Both were more sativa looking with dense buds of small calyx. There was also a difference in potency of aroma between these individuals.

 

The seed stock “True Blueberry” currently under scrutiny derived from f2’s that were very “BK” or Berry Kush-like. These f2 “BK”’s were crossed with very “TF”, or “True Floral”, sometimes referred to as “Temple Flo”, mates in the f3 and/or f4 generation to brighten the head considerably. Once the right mix was discovered these f4’s (and beyond) crosses were inline bred (filial crossed) to stabilize the proper traits. The “flo” pheno’s are closer to the “TF” (“True Floral”, “Temple Flo”), headier side of the mix, most reminiscent of the Highland Oaxaca Gold.

 

 

 

 

 

“Grape Krush” (or “Blue Krush”)–a productive, deep-colored hybrid of very high quality. This plants exhibits partial to full leaf-deformities of the “krinkle” type, but with good structure and heavy bud production of large calyxes. The buds express a strong sharp/fruity odor with a distinct sweet/grape flavor brought out in the cure. A strong, long-lasting head/body mix is evident in the finished product with an exciting, but not “racy”, head and a mild narcotic body. Very euphoric and desirable effects that most seasoned connoisseurs prefer. 50-60 day flowering time.

 

“Flodica” – a mostly indica phenotype from the flo line. A rare, near-total recessive indica found by chance in the “TF” line (“TF”= “Temple Flo” or “True Floral”). Generally, the flo line sports very sativa like structures of taller plants with slender leaves and spear-shaped buds. The “Flodica”, however, is a near-pure indica phenotype of short, stout, yet productive, structure with very large, dense, dark indica buds. Very resinous with heavy gland production of an earthen palate to the buds that produce a very strong, narcotic-type experience. 50-55 day flowering time. Unfortunately, the “Flodica” (and the “True Blue Moonshine”) were nearly sterile--i.e. no (or very few) seeds developed, and were therefore culled.

 

“True Blueberry”–the ultimate hybrid of Blueberry expression. Selected for its superior quality from a large pool, this hybrid contains the best from both worlds (indica and sativa). Medium height with long, fruity and productive buds of medium sized calyxes. Beautiful lavender hues become apparent soon into the flowering cycle. The finished product is of the highest quality with sweet, elongated Blueberry buds destined to please the most finicky palate. High resin production as expected from the “Blue” family. 50-60 days flowering time.

 

“True Blue Moonshine”–a true “hash-plant”. Selected for its outstanding production of large, clear gland heads, this mostly-indica hybrid really packs a musky/fruity punch. Medium height producing parge, dense buds glistening with trichomes. More musky than fruity with a burgundy/earthen flavor at cure. Top-notch Moonshine. 50-60 days flowering time.

 

“F-13"–a Holy Grail plant of four-star excellence. Previously unreleased, a very desirable product and potential breeder. A more-sativa hybrid of medium height with long, spear-shaped, dense and resinous buds and an earlier finish time than most sativa. The superfluous quality of the finished product is remarkable: a clear, clean, crisp head of the kindest order with a sweet/floral flavor. This girl really rings the bell every time! Not for the couch-lock crowd, this heady sativa is for those who truly enjoy its stimulating yet comfortable appeal. A real day (or night) brightener. My personal favorite from this batch. 50-65 days flowering time.

 

Stay tuned for future re-releases of Velvet Luna (formerly Blue Satellite and Blueberry Sativa), Moonshine Rocket Fuel and Rosebud in the not-too-distant future. Have fun and best regards toward your horticultural ventures. Enjoy!

 

 

 

25 Years Growing Indoors by DJ Short

 

Tales from a Breeder of Fine Cannabis

 

In the '70's, connoisseur-quality marijuana was being imported from all corners of the world, but one grower decided to sprout some of those seeds in the privacy of his own house. Working with original genetics, pioneer indoor grower DJ Short has since produced some of the finest herb which has never seen the light of day

 

Its our time. Time to sprout and plant. Time to water and feed. Time to grow and mature. And finally, time to cut, cure and - my favorite - time to consume the fruits of the labor. There was once a time, not too ancient, when it was all done in the great outdoors, under the full, open sky. But as fate would have it, some creatures have chosen to appoint themselves as predators. They have chosen to prey upon the good folk who produce and use the blissful fruit of cannabis.

 

Some of the more sadistic control freaks of the world have taken it upon themselves to fabricate rules and laws that demonize and criminalize the production, transport, sale, possession and/or use of this amazingly benign and benevolent substance we know as cannabis. These latter day witch hunters like to believe that they are succeeding. But we know better, only now things have to be done behind closed doors.

I am slowly trying to accept the fact that I have been a closet horticulturalist for 25 years now. Let me tell you, I have the hairs to prove it!

 

In the early 1970's we did not know much at all about growing good herb. We knew we had grand quantities of seed from the commercial Mexican and Columbian herb that we were consuming. And we knew that the plants grew from seeds. But we couldnt get the damn things to sprout, no matter how hard we tried. Years later we found out that the seeds in those huge, multi-ton commercial shipments were sterilized - some by pressure, others by heat (steam), and (rumor has it) some by irradiation.

 

Two phenomena sparked what would become my lifelong ambition. The first came in 1973, when I received a little "seed sprouting chamber". A two inch round clear plastic bubble that came as a prize in a box of breakfast cereal. It had one flat side that opened with a little sponge that sat in the bottom.

 

It just so happened that I had acquired a decent quantity of good, semi-commercial, seeded Hawaiian. I put a whole finger-tipped sized seeded bud into the moistened chamber. A few days later the seeds sprouted and roots shot through the buds - and away we go! These early plants sat under a 12-inch fluorescent desk lamp and grew to be one to two feet tall. This was the humble beginning of my indoor marijuana cultivation experience.

 

In 1974 another important event occurred - the founding of High Times magazine. Tome Forcase's vision accurately pegged and era and served a movement. I bought my first copy, the second issue, shortly after coming of age. The first issue had already sold out by the time I discovered it. High Times lent a great amount of credibility to what many of us knew to be true: that certain personal freedoms and liberties are natural rights, yearning to be exercised and expressed. Also in the mid '70's, Mel Frank and Ed Rosenthal finally taught us how to "grow the good buds" through their timely how-to grow books.

 

It was after this that another interesting progression was able to occur. Certain American growers became proficient at growing and understanding the finer qualities of the herb. Some of them moved to regions of the world famed for their high quality cannabis. I like to refer to these specific regions as "sweet spots". Many teamed up with the locals, while others designed their own production schemes. But their goals were the same; to help fund and produce high-quality, semi-commercial quantities of indigenous and designer cannabis. Many of these entrepreneurs were very successful in their quests, both in terms of quantity and quality.

 

From the mid '70's to the early '80's, some of the finest herb of all time was produced and distributed. These "sweet spot" areas included many parts of the highland Oaxaca and southern Mexico, Columbia, Thailand, Africa, Hawaii, Jamaica and the Northern California/Southern Oregon coastal mountain regions, to name a few. The famous hashish-producing areas of the Arab world and Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkey, Lebanon, Morocco and Nepal - were also very active. These areas originated the acclimated land race varieties that were the P1 generations of much of the seed strains available today.

 

It is important to realize what it is that made each of these varieties of herb so distinctive and desirable. Back then the main terms used to describe fine herb referred to its "head". What kind of "head" or head space, or mind, or feeling, or whatever it is one uses to refer to the stone, does the bud give? A question often asked concerning the quality of the experience of good herb might be: "Does it have a good head?" (Or a happy, goofy, stony, sleepy, paranoid or nervous head?) The ganja varieties of this era and these regions each offered their own unique heads, which were not yet availible from the limited environments of our indoor grown worlds. But we were getting closer.

 

A good head high is not entirely dependent upon set and setting. Up until the late 1970's my setting was Detroit. And there were few setting more depressingly awful then Detroit in the winter. Yet my buds and I were able to get incredibly high, high enough for us to rise above the depression of the urban blight around us, and to see beyond. I attribute much of our anti-depression (and "intact" survival for that matter) to the high quality, "good head" herb that was available to us then. Good head herb has the tendency to expand the consciousness of those who use it. We were learning and growing, and my expanding consciousness began to learn of an OZ-like land to the west.

 

Oregon - the promised land, during that period anyhow. Governor Tom McCall was the first major politician to survive the "third rail issue" and mandate cannabis decriminalization. He was also very green in his efforts to restore and protect the natural environment. And rumor was beginning to spill about another very green bounty of the region: West Coast sensimillia, the seedless buds. Hippy-magnet vortices developed all up and down the Pacific Northwest coast. In and around Humboldt, the Oxbow, the Applegate, Ashland, Eugene, Portland, Olympia, Seattle, and Vancouver, B.C. (to name but a few) cannabis communities sprouted and thrived.

 

My first bag of sensimillia came from a reputable dealer in Eugene in 1978 I have been blessed with the knack of making good connections. I believe it has to do with a certain respect of etiquette - the ability to conduct ones self in a professional manner and the ability to recognize the same respect and professionalism (or lack thereof) in others. This dealer had good Columbian for $55 and ounce. I was used to paying $40-$45 an ounce for good "Lum" , our slang for Columbian back in Detroit, and the "sticker shock" took some getting used to. He mentioned having something called "Oregon sensi". He called it "Butler Green" and it was going for $70 and ounce.

 

"Ouch! $70 an o-z, Man thats steep!" I thought. But the little bright-green bud the dealer gave me to check out had me very curious. It was so different compared to the herb I was used to. It was so fresh and green and sweet! "Will ya do a half for $35?" I asked. "Sure" The dealer was flexible and I had cash, so I ordered a half of the Lum and a half of the Green. He went to another room to weigh up the bags while I waited. When he returned he handed me the two-finger half of seed-weighty Lum in the traditional sandwich baggie, and a fat ziplock sack of green sensi buds.

"Oh, hey man, I only wanted a half of the green" I stated. The dealer, only slightly annoyed with my naivete said, "That is a half". Holy Moly! I was sold.

 

By 1979, many people along the West Coast were growing relatively openly in their backyards and other areas. Certain years yielded tremendous results. Many growers experienced unexpected bumper windfall harvests in '79 and '80. Well cared for plants grew into at least four to five foot bushes which could easily yield over a pound of high quality bud. It was fun having shelves stocked full of giant glass jars filled with perfectly matured, manicured and cured buds.

The indoor grow scene progressed considerably during this period. Mel and Ed did their first "Indoor Under Lights" grow books. Early on it was all fluorescents, Vita-Lites and Grow-Lux Bulbs, high output and very high output systems, and the equipment soon developed. Some outdoor growers used indoor methods during the off-season (winter) to develop and produce the next years stock. The first Halides appeared in late 1978, and the high pressure sodiums systems soon followed.

 

The late '70's, up to and including 1980, was truly an era for the expansion of cannabis consciousness. So many things were going so well, and there were so many things happening. I'm not sure if it was "us" behaving so boldly back then who spooked the status quo into electing Ronald Reagan president, or what. It was probably destined to happen regardless. But the '80's soon became the evil twin of the '60's. The foolish flames of the War on Drugs were fanned back into existence, to the delight of many a greedhead. Paramilitary raids on outdoor grows intensified limiting supplies. As supplies dropped, prices rose. More and more outdoor producers moved indoors, some on a commercial level. For many it became a time to hide. For some it was a time to run.

And the indoor grow industry breathed a life of its own. Advances in equipment technology were regular and swift, and the industry blossomed.

 

My forte was the breeding of fine herb. My primary goal was always to satisfy my own head. The primary aspect I attribute my breeding successes to is a very sensitive, discerning and educated palate. I was one of the lucky few who had access to many different strains. Id been collecting and saving imported seeds since 1975, which was the basis of my early breed stock. These imports however, were all Sativas.

 

The first indica buds entered the market in 1979. They all came from one source in Northern California who had imported the seed directly from Afghanistan. Short, stout, dark, compact and skunky, these plants were totally different from what the industry had been accustomed to. The most desirable features of the pure indica varieties were their compact productivity and short growing season. Indica plants produced large, dense potent buds very quickly. They soon became the variety of choice for growers, especially those on the indoor scene. The pure Indica head was generally much more of a narcotic and sleepy/dreamy body high, as opposed to the soaring cerebral buzzes of the sativas.

 

I was not at all pleased with the pure indica head. It lacked much of the good head quality I had grown fond of. It had its place, but for me, its place was rather limited. I did however, enjoy the plants good growing qualities along with its potency so I began "working" with it in 1979. Incidentally, the imported strains that I had been working with were Golden and Chocolate Thai (some loose and some from stick). The Golden Thai became known as "Juicy Fruit Thai" and the Chocolate Thai became known as Purple Thai. Both were sweet and fruity. Others included Purple/Gold Highland Oaxacan, Lowland Columbian Red, High Coastal Columbian Gold, a nice Guerreroan Green Spike, various Hawaiian and Jamaican, a ":woody" Mexican Flowertop and a Piney/Citral from India that I called "Gin Blossom". I had also been working with a few of the more special local treats (from the prized new renegade seeds that I found).

After a couple years of working the breeder's magic and performing the necessary crosses, the Sweet Kush Indicas arrived in 1981. These ranged in luscious flavors from honey to various fruits and berries. "Blueberry Kush" became the herb of choice for many growers and smokers from then on. I spent several more years of research and development before finally yielding the floral and blossom flavors of "Flo", "Blue Velvet" and other strains that I had bred.

The late '80s and early '90s were some of the hardest years on us growers. The Campaign Against Marijuana Planting escalated to a frenzy, and Operation Green Merchant went after the indoor farmers and equipment suppliers. Mandatory minimum sentences and unjust forfeiture laws proved to be a greater burden on the community. We were forced further underground - deeper and smaller. It was a very rough go for awhile there. We were scraping the bottom during those lean years.

 

I learned early on that the best camouflage in regard to greedheads was under a veil of poverty. That is where I tenaciously waited for the sun to shine again. And that is where I protected and continued my humble but precious stash.

 

And now, going into '99 the sun seems to be beginning to shine a little more lately. The clouds are slowly parting in many parts of the world. In parts of Canada, Europe, the South Pacific and even some places in the States, many people are beginning to lighten up their attitudes and open their minds towards cannabis. I do hope that the trend continues and our cannabis consciousness has a chance to expand and grow a little further. As for the long run, I know a few things for certain; We will survive, and the sun will shine again. After all its merely a matter of time.

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Here is a quote from breeder steve:

 

My assignment was to judge the entries of the ninth annual Cannabis Cup and report my findings to Cannabis Canada. My dream job!

 

Somehow I managed to try almost all of the entries, yet since I didn't try every one I decided not to cast my ballot. Instead I simply devoted myself to finding the best bud and hash in Amsterdam, wherever it might be.

 

The Very Best Bud

Unfortunately, the very best bud I smoked all week was not entered in the Cup. It was grown in Oregon one year ago, and stored in a safety deposit box since then. It consisted of a variety of small samples of seeded bud. These were the parents of Flo and Blue Velvet, and they were cleaned and rolled by the breeder himself.

 

This pot was the most electric I smoked in Amsterdam. This guy has been breeding for twenty years and he takes it seriously as an art rather than a pure science. I found this reassuring, as I really respect this man's work and his ability to pull it off in such a repressive nation. He was quietly brave and happily pleasant, way to go.

 

This is the man that brought you Blueberry, however he did not grow the commercial version now available in Amsterdam, and was disappointed by what was going around representing his strains.

His herb made the hairs on my neck tingle, a full on stoning that covered all the bases. I hope I run into him again!

*Footnote:

The parents were two samples.

-One displayed very strong Purple Thai influence/electric in nature/ie Flo.

-One displayed fruity Juicy Fruit Thai influence/Powerful yet euphoric/ie BBS

 

 

FWIW, the Blueberry used in the BB x SDIbl I made was just the kind of Blueberry sativa described by Breeder Steve. Floral in smell, berry-sweet taste, extremely strong! According to the vague amounts of info I can find it was grown from a hundred or so BB's and stuck out in both it's qualities and sativa characteristics. Apparently, the reworked Blueberry's and True Blueberry no longer have this since either the dad or both parents were lost in 2000.

 

 

 

 

How to create amazing new strains with a discerning palate, careful selection and some hard work.

 

Perhaps the most important aspect to consider in the breeding of fine quality cannabis is that of selection. Selective breeding is where all of today's varieties evolved from.

In the past, this chore was made easier by the fact that most of the commercially available herb was seeded and imported from outdoor plantations, usually near-equatorial in origin. These "land-race" Sativa varieties were the building blocks of the burgeoning domestic productions of the times.

 

The Indica (Afghan, Kush, Skunk, etc.) genetics were specially imported by West Coast interests and available to the general public around 1978. It was shortly after this time that the variance of domestic cannabis increased exponentially, as people began experimenting with crossing these two different types of pot.

 

Beginning breeding

 

The typical way to begin a breeding program is to carefully select P1 parents of pure Sativa and pure Indica, crossing them to produce an f1 hybrid that is uniform in its phenotypic growth patterns. The next step is the crossing of the f1 type with itself, which produces a very wide variation witnessed in the f2 growth patterns and expressions.

 

It is in this f2 second-generational cross and beyond that the art of selection really comes into play. There are a number of factors to consider at this point, such as what the male and female will each contribute; and most of all, what will the overall quality of the finished product be like?

 

Defining a goal and constructing a plan to accomplish it is called "top-down" programming, and this "top-down" approach applies well to cannabis breeding. It helps considerably to have a specific goal in mind when attempting to selectively breed a variety of ganja. This simple fact I cannot emphasize enough.

 

One must at least have an idea of what one is aiming for before beginning. For me this has little to do with plant structure and much to do with the quality of the finished product, no matter what form it is in. Having an experienced and educated palate (both mentally aesthetic and physically discernable) is key in the art of breeding fine quality cannabis.

 

The "goal" at the center of most of my breeding targets would be to replicate, as near as possible, the experiences produced by the great land-race varieties of old: Highland Oaxacan or Thai, Santa Marta or Acapulco Gold, Guerrero Green, Panama Red or Hawaiian Sativa? or the hash from regions such as Lebanon, Afghanistan or Nepal.

 

The indoor grow environment is too generic to fully replicate the great old legends. Therefore, it was necessary to settle for the next best thing: happy Sativa/Indica crosses that would perform well indoors. (It is interesting to note here that most of the fine land-race Sativa were hermaphroditic, though sometimes only minimally.)

 

Outdoor Australian Sativa; inset: seeded bud Outdoor Australian Sativa; inset: seeded bud Selection process

 

Obviously, you seek the parents that will produce the desired progeny. Paradoxically, this process requires selecting the best after they've been harvested. The solution is to keep samples from each plant of a test crop. This can be done via rooted clones from earlier cuttings, or re-greened mothers and fathers kept in a vegetative state and a high-nitrogen diet. Once you have chosen among the harvested plants, you can use the rooted cuttings for future consideration and possible breeding.

 

Pollen may also be gathered and immediately stored via vacuum sealing and deep-freezing. It is crucial to vacuum seal and freeze pollen immediately after it is collected and to use stored pollen immediately after it thaws. Dry seeds also store well over indefinite periods of time in an undisturbed deep-freeze, with some desiccant.

 

This process of post-harvest selection works fine for selecting desired female plants. But what about males? What is the best and most simple way to select males for breeding? Due to the fact that it is the female plants that we are ultimately familiar with, selecting males is a bit more involved.

 

The process is basically the same as it is with female plants, except with males the numbers are first limited down via a process of elimination, and selections made by comparing the remainder. Selecting males also takes a little more time initially as the quality of the male is not fully determined until after the seeds it produces are grown out and tested. As one becomes more familiar with a particular strain, the specific characteristics of the desirable males become apparent.

 

Ideally, the more seeds one starts with the better. This is, after all, a numbers game. I will assume that any basic breeding project starts with at least 20 different plants, from 20 viable seeds of high quality, professionally stabilized varieties. This would give a minimum of 10 male and 10 female plants hopefully sexed by two weeks into a flowering light cycle (short day/long night).

 

Once sexed, the process of elimination may begin. All of the females are kept and regularly examined to prevent unwanted hermaphroditism. Unwanted males and all hermaphrodites must be eliminated before they begin to shed pollen ? usually by the third week in the flowering cycle. The female plants need to be checked for hermaphroditism until harvest.

 

(A quick word on "backward" hermaphrodites ? declared males that eventually sport female flowers ? as opposed to the usual female-to-male hermaphrodites. These are semi-rare occurrences, usually sterile but sometimes viable, that I have found at times to be valuable in their genetic contributions. Some of the most resinous and desirable males I have encountered exhibited this trait. This trait almost seems to guarantee against unwanted hermaphroditism in subsequent generations as it also increases the female to male ratio in its progeny.)

 

Recessivecombination

 

A word needs to be said about the not-too-common probabilities of what I generally refer to as a recessive combination phenomenon. Sometimes, though not often, two parents that appear to express a common desirable trait ? let's say a sweet/fruity bouquet ? are crossed and the progeny do not express the desirable trait.

 

This usually means that one or both parents possessed some sort of recessive alleles in their genotype for this characteristic. But it could also mean that the progeny had a different environment that the parents.

 

If environment can be ruled out then it is likely that some sort of a genetic recessive combination is the cause. If none of the progeny express the desired characteristic one may want to cross the progeny with itself and see what the outcome is.

 

If a common "Punnet ratio" such as 25% of a progeny express the desirable trait, then the trait is more than likely recessive and the trait may be stabilized via crossing any two of the 25% (or whatever common ratio) that show the desired trait with each other. This process is time consuming and is generally followed only if no other alternatives exist.

 

Selecting males

 

I prefer to remove all of the males from the grow-room to a separate, isolated space shortly after they declare their sex and well before they begin to shed pollen. A small space lit with simple fluorescent light will suffice for the males for the next few weeks. During this time the female buds will fatten with more flowers while your collection of males is selected down.

 

I generally employ a simple process of elimination while selecting males. First, any auto-flowering or very early-declared males are eliminated. (Auto-flowering means that male flowers form regardless of light cycle timing.) This is mainly to insure against hermaphroditism or unwanted flowering traits, but also as a means to insure quality. The very early declared males have a tendency to be less desirable in terms of their contributions to the quality of the finished product. (If you are trying to specifically create an early-flowering strain, then your priorities may be different.)

 

Next, any male plant that grows too tall or too fast is usually eliminated. The reason for this is that most plants which dedicate so much energy to fiber production generally are best for making fiber. The exception to this rule is when an over-productive plant also exhibits a number of the desirable characteristics mentioned later.

 

The next criteria for elimination is borrowed from Michael Starks' book, Marijuana Potency, and involves stem structure. Large, hollow main stems are sought while pith-filled stems are eliminated. Backed by years of observation, I agree that hollow stems do seem to facilitate THC production.

 

Another consideration is the type of floral clusters that develop. Even on males, clusters which are tight, compact and yet very productive are desired over an airy, loose structure. These observations are most notable in the indoor environment. Outdoors, the differences in stem and floral structures are more difficult to discern.

 

The next and perhaps most important characteristic to examine is that of odor, flavor and trichome development. Again, the females will prove themselves by their finished product, but the males are a bit trickier.

 

I usually begin with a Sativa female and an Indica male. It has been my observation that the females primarily contribute the type of flavor and aroma and the males contribute the amount of flavor and odor. The "Sativa/Indica" aspects of this formula are mainly apparent in the P1 or very early filial crosses (to about f3). Beyond the f3 generation the apparent "Sativa/Indica" ratio in a given individual is less important than the odor/flavor and trichome development aspects it exhibits. Therefore, one of the main aspects to consider when selecting a male is the depth of its aroma and flavor. (If you are seeking to develop a low-odor indoor strain you might wish to begin with a low-odor Sativa male and an Indica female.)

 

With the remaining males I usually employ an odor/flavor test. Using males at least two or three weeks into the flowering cycle (and preferably beyond if a separate, isolated space is being used), a sort of "scratch-and-sniff" technique is first employed. With clean, odor-free fingers, gently rub one plant at a time, on the stem where it is well developed and pliable, above the woody part and below the developing top (approximately at the spot where a clone would be cut). The newer leaves at their halfway point of development may also be rubbed and sniffed.

 

These are the places that the earliest chemical signatures of a developing plant present themselves, and it is our intent to gently disturb these chemicals and inspire an odor/flavor reaction on the fingers and on the plant. By examining these various aromas in this way one may be able to determine certain desirable (and also undesirable) characteristics. After clearing one's palate and refreshing one's fingers, another plant may be tested.

 

The finalists are best compared for at least a week and at different times of day, to determine who performs best over a period of time.

 

A few of the "good" aromas which I have found to be associated with both male and female high quality cannabis are: sweet, floral, fruity, berry, wine/brandy, other savory spirits, skunky and spearmint. Some of the "bad" aromas associated with both male and female cannabis are: grassy, chlorophyll (green), celery, parsley, carrots, cinnamon, pepper-mint or wintergreen, gear-oil and gasoline. Some of the aromas that are considered "good" from females but not necessarily from males are: woody, cedar, pine, citrus, tropical fruit, chocolate, vanilla, coffee, garlic and astringent.

 

Worldwide weed

 

It is sad that due to the Unfortunate State of Assholes in the world today we herbalists are treated criminally. Sad because given saner times we would be able to produce vast amounts of fine quality herb by virtue of no more than the great outdoors, large numbered populations and trial and error.

 

Someday perhaps, but in the meantime I have few alternate suggestions. Holland, Denmark, Switzerland, Spain and other parts of Europe are opening up more and more toward herbal tolerance. It is relatively easy in these places to score some high quality product.

 

It is advisable for the newbie to a scene to buy many small samples of herbals at first until one finds what one likes. Just like in any other travel situation, special surprises await those willing to venture out from the centralized tourist areas (except in Christiania where "one stop shopping" is greatly enjoyed).

 

I am willing to bet that some of the many herbal "sweet spots" around the globe may once again be producing their specialties. I am eager to verify any rumor of such possibilities. These sweet spots would include many equatorial and near equatorial regions such as Colombia, Highland Mexico, parts of Thailand, Burma and Bhutan to name a few. Places such as Nepal and Jamaica have been ideal for herbal expeditions as well. These are some of the places one could venture in search of educating one's herbal palate and expanding one's experience. n

 

Constant testing

 

After selections are made, it is also necessary to remember to test for these qualities across a number of clone generations. Do the desirable characteristics present in a new plant (from seed) persist through the following clone generations of that plant? Does the plant from clones of the original carry the same odor/flavor quality? The same potency? Overall desirability? The answers most definitely need to be "yes" if that individual is to be considered for future breeding.

 

With much practice and years of experience it becomes apparent to those with a sensitive palate which individuals possess the most desirable characteristics from a given sample.

I suggest that your taste and smell be augmented with the use of an illuminated magnifier, either 30X, 60X or 100X power

will do.

 

Look at the same aforementioned spot on the stem or developing leaves any time after the second week in the bud cycle and look for the greatest abundance of developing trichomes or secretory hairs (hairs that secrete fluid obvious at 30X and above magnification). More fully developed trichomes with very clear heads are generally the most desirable.

 

These observations need to be done over a period of time (that is, not just a one-time look) and at different times of the day to determine which individuals perform best. Many various phenomena become apparent to those who are able to pay close attention over a period of time. To that effect I suggest you compile and composite detailed notes on one's observations, and to compare those notes over time. Detailed, comprehensive notes are the hallmark of any successful breeding program.

 

It is possible to test males by smoking or otherwise consuming them. This practice may be somewhat beneficial to beginners as it does involve a sort of obvious discretion. I suggest using only fresh tips, properly cured and rolled into a joint. Also, make sure that this test smoke is the first smoke one consumes in a day in order to best discern its qualities, or lack thereof.

 

Some other aspects to consider

 

There are a number of aesthetic considerations to consider regarding fine quality cannabis breeding, such as color, overall structure, growth patterns and various bouquets. My primary goal involves finding the finished product with the most desirable and pleasant effects. So I focus on those aspects and stabilize them first. Once stabilized, a backcross or a cross to another variety may be utilized to further improve the line and/or increase vigor, if necessary.

 

On the experimental level the finished product is expected to be either pleasant or powerful, depending on the individual. I prefer an herb that is pleasantly powerful or powerfully pleasant! So that is the sought-after goal. The range of experiences elicited by cannabis can vary from bliss to panic to stupefying. I much prefer the bliss aspects.

 

The best descriptive dichotomy in this case would be comfort vs. discomfort. I also suppose some personality types may enjoy a more exciting experience ? perhaps only once in awhile ? a feeling somewhat akin to the entertainment of a roller coaster ride or a horror movie.

 

Cannabis is unusual in its varying effects on our vascular-circulatory system. Some cannabis strains seem to act as a vasodilator and others as a vasoconstrictor. A vasoconstrictor is a substance that constricts blood vessels. It tends to elicit tension, excitement, anxiety, and even panic. A vasodilator is a substance that dilates blood vessels and tends to relax a person more easily into a blissful state. Therefore, I tend to prefer cannabis that seems to act as a vasodilator, simply not to the point of couch lock sedation.

 

I have nothing against powerfully stony herb. It is just that as long as my breeding space is limited, I will choose to work with the more pleasant varieties ? those that elicit a generally happy experience. Someday I look forward to working at stabilizing many different varieties of herb. After all, to each their own.

 

Tinnitus and dyskinesia are common symptoms of a vasoconstrictor reaction. Tinnitus is ringing in the ears, and dyskinesia, in this instance, is usually felt as a tingling in the extremities, especially the little fingers, toes and ears. Another bad sign would be any form of tension headache or unwanted body load. If these symptoms occur regularly after indulging in a particular herb, the herb may be contributing to the sensation.

 

Does it pass the acid test?

 

To borrow and paraphrase a disclaimer from Dr Hunter S Thompson; "I cannot condone drug usage, but I must admit it has worked well for me." In particular, the psychedelics (entheogens, entactogens, and hallucinogens included) are paramount as a testing tool when breeding fine quality cannabis.

 

A favored testing formula of mine involves preparations being made days in advance. One needs to have a perfectly cured sample of the herb one wishes to test ready at hand before the test. Fasting (from substances primarily, but also some foods) and cleansing (exercise, sweating or sauna, re-hydration and meditation, etc.) are employed for a period prior to the test. This is to as fully as possible re-calibrate one's baseline state of consciousness to its most basic, clean state.

 

A time is selected, a toast made and the trip material is ingested. I generally like to eat a simple meal of soup or juice and bread after I ingest a substance and before I begin to alert (first noticing the effect of a substance).

 

Do not ingest any herb, or any other consciousness-altering substance until after one has alerted, preferably prior to the peak of the trip. Ingest only a small amount of the herb to be tested at first, one toke at a time, unless this is a follow-up test and one is already familiar with the experience.

 

Ideally, the psychedelic substance will further the range of noticeable subtleties by one's psyche and allow a broader appreciation of the effect from the herb. An herb that is truly powerful and pleasant will usually profoundly express its experience upon the opened mind. That is, if the herb is truly blissful it will become more readily apparent under such psychedelic examination. Likewise, if the herb is somewhat "panicky" or "anxious" in experience, the psychedelic will exacerbate these qualities as well.

 

I am assuming, and offering fair warning, that those who attempt such a test are well-experienced psychic travelers. That is, all necessary considerations of set and setting must be satisfied before attempting such a trial. The psychedelic substance almost seems to act as a sort of mental catalyst when combined with herb. This combination is able to cause both desirable and undesirable traits of the herb experience to become more so apparent to the initiated mind.

 

These are some of the techniques, selections and considerations that I employ when breeding fine quality cannabis. Famed horticulturist Luther Burbank's quote: "select the best and reject all others" is the single most important aspect to consider.

 

With time, focus and patience the knack for recognizing desirable and undesirable traits becomes more apparent. Having an open and curious mind, along with a developed sense of intuition, is beneficial.

 

May your ventures be fruitful.

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Hope this shows up as a separate post...

 

Here is a chart of the process leading to DJ's lines:

 

gallery_312_1070_252150.jpg

 

Here is his Olifactory chart:

 

gallery_312_1070_86177.jpg

 

 

There are many articles from his books going over in detail all the minutae involved in his process. I've got one of his books, was interesting. I tried his curing method and in my climate I got bud rot, so went back to what worked best for me.

 

There are a couple of posters at IC who worship this guy and have filled hundreds of pages with information you may or may not find useful.

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Sanne is right on the money. DJ short is the only Breeder beside Sannie to be completely transparent about his process. He was one of the last to have large fields to work with and invented Blueberry from scratch using Juicy Fruit Thai, Highland Oaxacan Gold and something I can't remember. Took 7 years I believe to get true breeding parents. He's got a chart with the process.

I've ordered only from Legends in Canada.

The Breeder Chimera is close to him and breeds with some of his parents. Breeder Steve from Spice of Life appears to be retired.

 

True.

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Holy mother of Buddha what frickin excellent responses, I believe that if your a breeder the general growing part it mastered. (not me yet) :)

I belong to some 15-17 Cannabis sights in search of intelligent life and I swear to Buddha this sight has the most inform peps out there.

 

I got to read this twice and save it too, dam good and how Sannie can give praise where others would lock the thread thinking they where losing business, thanks for the info, still loyal here always, can't wait to try the Sannie Jack I got going.

 

F1 F2 F6 holy shit, year 2, still poking along in the book smarts

 

8 weeks today

7 Sannie Jack

1 Midget, Twisted Shack :)

2 Jackberry X Blue Kronic

I'll take a picture of the 7 sisters tonight to show the Sannie Jack variation in shapes for comments please?

Thanks again all!

gallery_1327_1113_894721.jpg

Sannie Jack 8 Weeks

gallery_1327_1113_397899.jpg

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Looking really good to me, haven't grown any of those before. So the Jack has a few more weeks to go? You are right, why edit out something that is true. But someone like Sannie and Esco can find traits and breed them out. Blueberry Sativa is really great shit. And it's also interesting that most flavors come from the sativas. The afghani's are really used just to bring down the flower time it seems.

 

FWIW, I realise that WPW was right about the BB I have. It's a blueberry sativa. If you look at DJ's chart, the floral series leads to Blueberry Sativa. That's her, 2.5 stretch, smells like flowers, tastes sweet. Big Yields, no wonder the regular Blueberry is nothing like it.

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Beautiful trees you got there, Outlaw. And thanks for that excellent picture. It makes it so easy to get a study of them all at once... and what a stunning sight to look at :)

 

I look at this picture and I wonder about the different container sizes that the plants are in. At this stage of their growth, to what degree does the size of the planter have to do with the overall shape and size of the Sannie's Jacks? To what degree are the differences in the SJs shown in your picture caused by genetics? And those are all Sannie's F6s, right? What's the effect of them all being F6s have on their different-sized-ness?

 

 

... and those articles, Joker & Fla, totally AMAZING :)

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hahahah

 

UsualSuspectsLineup_560x330.jpg

 

Fenster: [laughing] Hand me the keys, you cocksucker.

Interrogation Cop: In English, please?

Fenster: Excuse me?

Interrogation Cop: In English.

Fenster: Hand me the fucking keys, you cocksucker, what the fuck?

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wow excellent read!

 

Thanks for the posts Joker & Fla! That was very informative and an inside view of a breeder's world!

 

And yes, not many breeders are open about their breeding programs the way Sannie, DJ, Chimera are, like Soma for example... it is a refreshing change fo sho!

 

Outlaw - The right hand pheno looks like a massive yielder..

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Very interesting read joker where might one find that??? Nice sannies jack outlaw very impressive. Have you noticed any differences other then size in the phenos? Make sure to do a smoke report and dry weight. Have fun and be safe. -BEEZY-

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MBeezy, it can't be found easily. I believe This is Me ( AKA TIM) made a blueberry sativa IBL and passed those around. The cut I have originated when Overgrow was still around and was supposedly found in 100 or so Blueberry seedlings, but from the floral nature, it may have been Blueberry sativa seedlings. The grower who grew it is a sweet woman and passed it around. There was a PG member who also posts here from time to time who passed it around to many people, including me. I plan on making S1's and crossing it to some of Sannie's gear.

 

Don't be offended, but I'm no longer gifting for many reasons, all of them good. I've done my part in spreading the wealth and am now focusing on my own security.

 

You may try some of the Blueberry Sativa offerings from Sannie. I also loved Spice of Life Blue Sattelite 2.2, which gave some great tasting phenos. But I know there are several people working on Blueberry Sativa.

 

I'm really wanting to grow Jackberry , Killing Fields or Madonna since they both have The One in them . The One is Blueberry Sativa x killa queen. I would like to see what males from those crossed to the BS mom will produce. This floral, sweet, tasty , high yielding aspect is something I really , really like.

I'm also dying just to smoke and grow them all. Those are my kind of plants. But it looks like Madonna x Killing Fields is coming up next. I will be planting some seeds in the next few weeks. Hope that helps ya.

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Beautiful trees you got there, Outlaw. And thanks for that excellent picture. It makes it so easy to get a study of them all at once... and what a stunning sight to look at :)

 

I look at this picture and I wonder about the different container sizes that the plants are in. At this stage of their growth, to what degree does the size of the planter have to do with the overall shape and size of the Sannie's Jacks? To what degree are the differences in the SJs shown in your picture caused by genetics? And those are all Sannie's F6s, right? What's the effect of them all being F6s have on their different-sized-ness?

 

 

... and those articles, Joker & Fla, totally AMAZING :)

 

I seem to miss posting getting back to me in email :)

Wow, your asking many of my same questions I'm asking myself, for an experiment I put the smallest girls in 7 gal pots to see the extra cola growth with it's extra root mass.

Yes that right hand girl is enjoying the extra space I think. B)

What is a F6 in relation to the lineup of girls I have.

Thanks :)

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Here are the 3 other girls, 2 Jackberry X Blue Kronic and one dwarf Twisted Shack, the Twisted Shack was always a runt from the start and the only girl out of 5 Twisted Shack seeds I germinated of them.

 

They all went into flower at 5 weeks, the Twisted Shack could have been maybe one of those giants I've seen (6') if given maybe 2 more weeks below or destine to be a runt?

 

gallery_1327_1113_216923.jpg

 

 

 

-------------------------------------

Twisted Shack (dropped from the gen pool because of it's weakness to Hermie with any form of light interruption I believe?)

https://www.opengrow.com/index.php?

gallery_622_409_69140.jpg

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MBeezy, it can't be found easily. I believe This is Me ( AKA TIM) made a blueberry sativa IBL and passed those around. The cut I have originated when Overgrow was still around and was supposedly found in 100 or so Blueberry seedlings, but from the floral nature, it may have been Blueberry sativa seedlings. The grower who grew it is a sweet woman and passed it around. There was a PG member who also posts here from time to time who passed it around to many people, including me. I plan on making S1's and crossing it to some of Sannie's gear.

 

Don't be offended, but I'm no longer gifting for many reasons, all of them good. I've done my part in spreading the wealth and am now focusing on my own security.

 

You may try some of the Blueberry Sativa offerings from Sannie. I also loved Spice of Life Blue Sattelite 2.2, which gave some great tasting phenos. But I know there are several people working on Blueberry Sativa.

 

I'm really wanting to grow Jackberry , Killing Fields or Madonna since they both have The One in them . The One is Blueberry Sativa x killa queen. I would like to see what males from those crossed to the BS mom will produce. This floral, sweet, tasty , high yielding aspect is something I really , really like.

I'm also dying just to smoke and grow them all. Those are my kind of plants. But it looks like Madonna x Killing Fields is coming up next. I will be planting some seeds in the next few weeks. Hope that helps ya.

 

 

Your smart dude :)

here's the genealogy of KF

 

gallery_1327_1113_46431.jpg

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Sanne is right on the money. DJ short is the only Breeder beside Sannie to be completely transparent about his process. He was one of the last to have large fields to work with and invented Blueberry from scratch using Juicy Fruit Thai, Highland Oaxacan Gold and something I can't remember. Took 7 years I believe to get true breeding parents. He's got a chart with the process.

I've ordered only from Legends in Canada.

The Breeder Chimera is close to him and breeds with some of his parents. Breeder Steve from Spice of Life appears to be retired.

 

I smoked some Cocoa Kush outdoor organic and it was some of the best weed Ive ever smoked.

 

When I have time, I'll cut and paste several articles from DJ on breeding. Informative reads.

 

My favorite smoke is a blueberry (sativa pheno) from DJ which is floral in smell ( the smoke

smells like gardenias) and berry intaste.

 

What fascinates me about Madonna and Jackberry is that they seem to be in this floral ,better yielding family of Blueberry.

When I smoke that Bb, even friends who don't smoke say: That smells so nice! It doesn't smell like pot, it smells like flowers.

 

Flo is short for floral and also expresses this quality. Besides the fact that I have mores

seeds than I could grow , the price tag keeps me from ordering cocoa kush.($150.00 )If esco's work with the cocoa is more

affordable , that would be great for me.

 

Hey Buddy! :) You should put Shantibaba @ Mr.Nice on that list as well. He is an incredible breeder and super nice human being. I am starting to explore his stuff now as it is probably some of the most stable gear on the market.

 

Also, Hemp Depot is a great place to obtain beans. I have a 100% success with delivery. DJ Short is very selective about who he does business with and Brad does a great job with his seed bank,

 

Nice plants there OG :) Good job!!!

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