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FoolOnTheHill

Grafting my motherplants

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Frankenfool !

 

 

Frankenstein is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates...

Shelley's name first appeared on the second edition, published in France in 1823.

 

 

+Laburnocytisus adamii arose in the nursery of Jean Louis Adam in France in 1825.

 

He must have been reading it!

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I made an attempt on an X-graft.

Two plants are in one pot for easier handling.

 

I chopped a bit of "flesh" out of a branch of each plant, and firmly joined the wounds.

 

gallery_20098_7032_162485.jpg

 

It will take about a week for both parts to join.

But I'll keep it wrapped a bit longer, just in case.

 

The hybrid plant on the right side will be the future rootstock of the Malzilla scion.

I hope.

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@gardenartus: Give it a try,

try it with that plant that you can't get to make roots.

Good Luck!

 

In a recent report, Zhang et al. (2013) observed increased productivity and rooting ability of cuttings obtained from grafted chrysanthemum.

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wow something new to try not heard of it before. I do similar for bonsai but never thought of it for herb

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Commercial grafting is currently practiced in a number of plant species, including fruits (citrus, apple, mango, grape, peach, plum, apricot, almond, and cherry), vegetables (watermelon, melon, cucumber, tomato, pepper, eggplant, and bitter gourd), and ornamentals (rose, chrysanthemum, bougainvillea, and bonsai), to obtain economic benefits.

 

In addition to these commercially important benefits, grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species...

 

Give it a try, rsa420.

 

Good luck!

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Yesterday was harvest time for a Mad Blue Diesel.

But instead of throwing away a healty root system, I tried to recycle it.

I removed all buds, but left some leafs on some intermediate branches,

and tried to V-graft a NewBlueDiesel scion on top of it.

 

 

gallery_20098_7032_297893.jpg

 

And put it under 18/6 flourescent light.

After 24 hours, all still looks good.

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Another attempt, done a few days ago.

 

gallery_20098_7032_239938.jpg

 

MalawiGold in not very demanding,

and can survive drought in a small pot.

So I think it could be a good rootstock for a combination-motherplant.

MG still has two of it's original branches, but I want to replace them in the future,

after the two new branches have firmly joined.

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Here's the Madblue+Malzilla after 4 days of 12/12 hps.

 

gallery_20098_7032_480742.jpg

 

It's in an 11-liter pot since yesterday.

The first pistils are visible on both parts of the grafted plant.

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Top view of the above plant, picture taken on the same date:

 

gallery_20098_7032_405391.jpg

 

I rotate the plant 180 degrees every day, to expose both parts equally to the 400W HPS light.

 

Another experiment:

What happens to the "autoflower trait" after grafting a "regular" scion to an auto plant?

 

gallery_20098_7032_26691.jpg

 

(vegetating sativa branch to an autoflower)

 

The plant is at 18/6 under fluorescent light.

Will the scion start flowering or keep vegging?

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The most vigorous plant in my collection is a polyhyrid, SZxNBD X IndiaSativa.

I kept a clone of it and I used it last week to graft a Malziila branch onto it.

 

gallery_20098_7032_404608.jpg

 

I topped both head shoots of the polyhybrid (PH in the picture) to stop it's dominance.

Looks like the Malzilla shoot is enjoying it. I cut it's stem in half, below the graft spot to make the furure separation less stressfull.

 

And I also tried to graft a shoot of NewBlueDiesel onto the second PH branch.

The flower pot of NBD is duct-taped to the other pot to prevent accidents.

 

And here's the MadBlue+Malzilla after day 6 @ 12/12.

 

gallery_20098_7032_632768.jpg

 

On it's own roots, Malzilla grows twice as high as the MadBlue under the same conditions.

 

In an experiment with two different strains of corn joined together (by Katsumi),

the short strain was able to benefit from the taller strain of corn.

And grew to twice it's normal size...

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MadBlue+Malzilla after day 8 @ 12/12.

 

gallery_20098_7032_1718.jpg

 

I went to the garden store and got "wound sealant for trees" and sealed the graft wound.

It's hardly visisible on the picture now.

 

And here's a top view of the creation:

 

gallery_20098_7032_91619.jpg

 

Difference in height between the two branches is about an inch.

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This is one of my favorite threads of all time. Kudos FOTH.

 

I have to agree and I appreciate FOTH showing this work.

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Agreed its a awesome idea I want to try this in the upcoming winter and get a monster ready for the spring to go out under the African sky.

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I always envisioned a big backup of many mothers in one plant like this.

http://www.treeof40fruit.com/

 

Grafting is one area I look to learn more of in the future. Imagine a private orchard of all kinds of willie wonka grafted type of trees. I can dream, I can dream haha.

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Thanks guys.

 

Here's the MadBlue+Malzilla after day 10 @ 12/12.

 

gallery_20098_7032_400527.jpg

 

gallery_20098_7032_277289.jpg

 

The Malzilla-scion (above the red lines) is about 50 cm high now (20 inches).

On the picture below you see it from the side (graft spot at the bottom of the picture).

 

gallery_20098_7032_10468629.jpg

 

And here's the Indica side, MadBlue, still on it's own roots.

 

gallery_20098_7032_595633.jpg

 

The difference in height is a little over an inch, about three cm.

Both parts developed an almost identical set of lower branches.

And I think the MadBlue is stretching more then usual.

But it's still too early to draw any more conclusions then that the rootstock so far seems compatible with the scion.

 

 

A lot of recearch has been done since I started this topic, Hempyfan,

on a wide variëty of plants, with remarkable results.

I'll name a few in my next post.

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MadBlue+Malzilla after dat 12 @ 12/12

 

gallery_20098_7032_330810.jpg

 

MadBlue part in the foreground.

Difference in height is now 8 cm (a little over three inch).

 

A previously developed grafting strategy was applied to graft a commercial cultivated variety of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. H-2274) onto Nicotiana rustica L. (cv. Hasankeyf) and Nicotiana tabacum L. (cv. Samsun) rootstocks.

Higher growth and leafing, and earlier flower onset were found in grafted than in non-grafted and self-grafted plants.

Significant 22.7 and 34.3% increases in fruit yield were obtained with Samsun and Hasankeyf rootstocks, respectively.

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Once the graft takes, it seems to really take off.

 

It's still unnatural, the devil's work and will lead to eternal damnation, but it's pretty cool, I have to admit.

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The rootstock should not overgrow the scion,

and that is clearly not the case.

 

The root system seems to be able to feed both different branches.

So far, Malzilla is not complaining.

The MadBlue-part will be ripe in about six weeks.

After that, Malzilla will have the whole root system for itself for a few more weeks.

I wonder what will happen then.

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Once the graft takes, it seems to really take off.

 

That seems to depend on the rootstock.

 

Here's a scion of the same plant on a different rootstock:

 

gallery_20098_7032_525414.jpg

 

NewBlueDiesel+Malzilla.

 

I'll veg it a few weeks, before it goes into the flower cabin.

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Any factors that let you predict which root stock should work? Is it strain specific, or is there a lot more to it?

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Some rootstock seems to be more efficiënt in the uptake of nutes and minerals.

 

Or in the use of water.

 

Growers of fruit trees choose their rootstock mainly based on their soil and climate.

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MadBlue+Malzilla after day 23 @ 12/12

 

Sativa side:

 

gallery_20098_7032_85028.jpggallery_20098_7032_421886.jpg

 

Indica side:

 

gallery_20098_7032_41981.jpg

 

Any factors that let you predict which root stock should work? Is it strain specific, or is there a lot more to it?

 

The above polyhybrid seems to work well, MrD.

My next bet is Polyhybrid x Landrace

In an attempt to find good rootstock I germinated some seeds and braided them together.

Then fixed them with some tape.

 

gallery_20098_7032_414780.jpg

 

Some bore braiding and another piece of tape and some more soil.

 

gallery_20098_7032_293605.jpg

 

More braiding and trainig will be done as they stretch.

And then I'll try and graft something onto it.

They are in a 20cm deep pot to give the tap roots some room.

 

It's (Shackzilla x NewblueDiesel) X India Sativa.

Very vigorous plants.

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