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Scone_Of_Ark

Mutant Plant Thread

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Manna,

 

I've seen a picture of a fan leaf with a single female flower in the center of it, but yours looks like it's still in the veg stage. It will be interesting to see what happens with it.

She is making buds on those leafs now :)

 

@BigJ

Only 2 leafs have this growt

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It is definitly not a desired trait. It will decrease growth on your main buds for sure.

Why ?

I see NO reason a little bud formation on a few fans leaves will lower main bud growth at all. I've had this many times and it malkes no difference to ANYTHING........bar extra cute buddage. I'd say a trait WELL WORTH HAVING.

 

I would also question as to whether this trait is 'Mutant' as I'm lead to believe there are a number of strains that do this randomly as a part of their natural growth.

 

Grtz HillCrest :P

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I have some mutants for you guys, all of them from my recent grow... :whistle:

 

Jackberry f3, Jackberry x KO kush and New blue diesel.

 

Jackberry f3 mutant(Finished awesome)

Jackberry x KO mutant

New Blue Diesel mutant(finished amazing)

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Bloody ell jwf that IS some mutant, sure you didn't aquire that from a recent alien abduction lol

 

Grtz HillCrest :P

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Bloody ell jwf that IS some mutant, sure you didn't aquire that from a recent alien abduction lol

 

Grtz HillCrest :P

 

Take me to your breeder lol. I reckon they bred this one for folks who like trimming.

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For some reason that plant makes me feel queezy? It reminds me of stitches. Sick man :vomit-smiley:

 

It used to freak me out too. When I came in stoned I was sometimes a bit scared to touch it, its natural but in a way just not natural. Its grown in soil and was fed only water. Looked a bit like those dudes from the band Cameo and who would want them in their grow space.

 

gallery_2091_1161_3499.jpg

 

gallery_2091_1161_17351.jpg

.

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Here is my female OldTimeMoonshine mutant! :) I haven't found any threads on running a mutant OTM, so I'll be showing her flowering on the Skunk forum. ;)

y2i2vayhb3kf4can3rg.jpg

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This was Barneys Farm, Top Dawg

Cool :) thats what they call "crested" grow. Here examples of crested peyote

 

my little mutant is blooming :lol:

according to R Connell Clarke their not fertile.

gallery_28959_11403_1136152.jpg

 

gallery_28959_11403_713466.jpg

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Why ?

I see NO reason a little bud formation on a few fans leaves will lower main bud growth at all. I've had this many times and it malkes no difference to ANYTHING........bar extra cute buddage. I'd say a trait WELL WORTH HAVING.

 

I would also question as to whether this trait is 'Mutant' as I'm lead to believe there are a number of strains that do this randomly as a part of their natural growth.

 

Grtz HillCrest :P

 

 

I had this mutation occur once when winter came two years ago. I had several grows over the summer with no mutation. When winter came, same plants, same clones, the mutation occured. I hadn't changed anything with the grow. This was also at a new house which had a different water source than the last. The old water source was from ground water, new house had water coming from a resivour.

 

I finally figured out that when winter came, the resivour water "turns over". I asked the water company if they used a different batch of chem's to treat the water and they said yes, a totally different combo. When the water turns over for the winter it pulls sediment and silt from the bottom of the resivour, creating a new problem.

 

After that grow was done, I yielded several pounds LESS than what I had in previous grows before at the same location. The buds just didn't fill out like they had before. After that one grow I brought in water from a ground water source and guess what? No mutation. I'm no longer living there and I'm back to a ground water source, thank god.

 

I have seen what that mutation can do, I'd rather not have it. If thats your thing, then enjoy!

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One thing is for sure, the mutant choco is much shorter then her two (topped) sisters.

gallery_28959_13101_2188161.jpg

 

gallery_28959_13101_3255490.jpg

well see :)

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iv got a plant that looks just like that b moonshine. only its a different strain and a miniture, thinking about making fem seeds from it and have the smallest seeds in the county.

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I'd bet a million dollars to one that plant is not a polyploid.

 

 

Here is a nice little read on polyploidism in cannabis, notice some key points I have highlighted for you.

 

Marijuana Botany, Robert Connel Clark, pub. 1981

Polyploidy

 

Polyploidy is the condition of multiple sets of chromosomes within one cell. Cannabis has 20 chromosomes in the vegetative diploid (2n) condition. Triploid (3n) and tetraploid (4n) individuals have three or four sets of chromosomes and are termed polyploids. It is believed that the haploid condition of 10 chromosomes was likely derived by reduction from a higher (polyploid) ancestral number (Lewis, W. H. 1980). Polyploidy has not been shown to occur naturally in Cannabis; however, it may be induced artificially with colchicine treatments. Colchicine is a poisonous compound extracted from the roots of certain Colchicum species; it inhibits chromosome segregation to daughter cells and cell wall formation, resulting in larger than average daughter cells with multiple chromosome sets. The studies of H. E. Warmke et al. (1942-1944) seem to indicate that colchicine raised drug levels in Cannabis. It is unfortunate that Warmke was unaware of the actual psychoactive ingredients of Cannabis and was therefore unable to extract THC. His crude acetone extract and archaic techniques of bioassay using killifish and small freshwater crustaceans are far from conclusive. He was, however, able to produce both triploid and tetraploid strains of Cannabis with up to twice the potency of dip bid strains (in their ability to kill small aquatic organisms). The aim of his research was to "produce a strain of hemp with materially reduced marijuana content" and his results indicated that polyploidy raised the potency of Cannabis without any apparent increase in fiber quality or yield.

 

Warmke's work with polyploids shed light on the nature of sexual determination in Cannabis. He also illustrated that potency is genetically determined by creating a lower potency strain of hemp through selective breeding with low potency parents.

 

More recent research by A. I. Zhatov (1979) with fiber Cannabis showed that some economically valuable traits such as fiber quantity may be improved through polyploidy. Polyploids require more water and are usually more sensitive to changes in environment. Vegetative growth cycles are extended by up to 30-40% in polyploids. An extended vegetative period could delay the flowering of polyploid drug strains and interfere with the formation of floral clusters. It would be difficult to determine if cannabinoid levels had been raised by polyploidy if polyploid plants were not able to mature fully in the favorable part of the season when cannabinoid production is promoted by plentiful light and warm temperatures. Greenhouses and artificial lighting can be used to extend the season and test polyploid strains.

 

The height of tetraploid (4n) Cannabis in these experiments often exceeded the height of the original diploid plants by 25-30%. Tetraploids were intensely colored, with dark green leaves and stems and a well developed gross phenotype. Increased height and vigorous growth, as a rule, vanish in subsequent generations. Tetraploid plants often revert back to the diploid condition, making it difficult to support tetraploid populations. Frequent tests are performed to determine if ploidy is changing.

 

Triploid (3n) strains were formed with great difficulty by crossing artificially created tetraploids (4n) with dip bids (2n). Triploids proved to be inferior to both diploids and tetraploids in many cases.

 

De Pasquale et al. (1979) conducted experiments with Cannabis which was treated with 0.25% and 0.50% solutions of colchicine at the primary meristem seven days after generation. Treated plants were slightly taller and possessed slightly larger leaves than the controls, Anomalies in leaf growth occurred in 20% and 39%, respectively, of the surviving treated plants. In the first group (0.25%) cannabinoid levels were highest in the plants without anomalies, and in the second group (0.50%) cannabinoid levels were highest in plants with anomalies, Overall, treated plants showed a 166-250% increase in THC with respect to controls and a decrease of CBD (30-33%) and CBN (39-65%). CBD (cannabidiol) and CBN (cannabinol) are cannabinoids involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of THC. THC levels in the control plants were very low (less than 1%). Possibly colchicine or the resulting polyploidy interferes with cannabinoid biogenesis to favor THC. In treated plants with deformed leaf lamina, 90% of the cells are tetraploid (4n 40) and 10% diploid (2n 20). In treated plants without deformed lamina a few cells are tetraploid and the remainder are triploid or diploid.

 

The transformation of diploid plants to the tetraploid level inevitably results in the formation of a few plants with an unbalanced set of chromosomes (2n + 1, 2n - 1, etc.). These plants are called aneuploids. Aneuploids are inferior to polyploids in every economic respect. Aneuploid Cannabis is characterized by extremely small seeds. The weight of 1,000 seeds ranges from 7 to 9 grams (1/4 to 1/3 ounce). Under natural conditions diploid plants do not have such small seeds and average 14-19 grams (1/2-2/3 ounce) per 1,000 (Zhatov 1979).

 

Once again, little emphasis has been placed on the relationship between flower or resin production and polyploidy. Further research to determine the effect of polyploidy on these and other economically valuable traits of Cannabis is needed.

 

Colchicine is sold by laboratory supply houses, and breeders have used it to induce polyploidy in Cannabis. However, colchicine is poisonous, so special care is exercised by the breeder in any use of it. Many clandestine cultivators have started polyploid strains with colchicine. Except for changes in leaf shape and phyllotaxy, no out standing characteristics have developed in these strains and potency seems unaffected. However, none of the strains have been examined to determine if they are actually polyploid or if they were merely treated with colchicine to no effect. Seed treatment is the most effective and safest way to apply colchicine. * In this way, the entire plant growing from a colchicine-treated seed could be polyploid and if any colchicine exists at the end of the growing season the amount would be infinitesimal. Colchicine is nearly always lethal to Cannabis seeds, and in the treatment there is a very fine line between polyploidy and death. In other words, if 100 viable seeds are treated with colchicine and 40 of them germinate it is unlikely that the treatment induced polyploidy in any of the survivors. On the other hand, if 1,000 viable treated seeds give rise to 3 seedlings, the chances are better that they are polyploid since the treatment killed all of the seeds but those three. It is still necessary to determine if the offspring are actually polyploid by microscopic examination.The work of Menzel (1964) presents us with a crude map of the chromosomes of Cannabis, Chromosomes 2-6 and 9 are distinguished by the length of each arm. Chromosome 1 is distinguished by a large knob on one end and a dark chromomere 1 micron from the knob. Chromosome 7 is extremely short and dense, and chromosome 8 is assumed to be the sex chromosome. In the future, chromosome *The word "safest" is used here as a relative term. Coichicine has received recent media attention as a dangerous poison and while these accounts are probably a bit too lurid, the real dangers of exposure to coichicine have not been fully researched. The possibility of bodily harm exists and this is multiplied when breeders inexperienced in handling toxins use colchicine. Seed treatment might be safer than spraying a grown plant but the safest method of all is to not use colchicine. mapping will enable us to picture the location of the genes influencing the phenotype of Cannabis. This will enable geneticists to determine and manipulate the important characteristics contained in the gene pool. For each trait the number of genes in control will be known, which chromosomes carry them, and where they are located along those chromosomes.

 

 

 

 

Also I agree with Hillcrest about the small flower formation on the leaf. I have seen it many times but never have I seen it decrease yield or vigor.

 

 

 

JWF - Interesting photo. The lemon thai male I used in the initial LT and Lemonberry cross carries that recessive trait. I have seen 1 female in each of the strains produce the "mohawk" flower. I'll go borrow a pic from MrGreenJeans, one of our beta testers. His LB looks almost identical to that. Seeing that same mutation makes me wonder how widespread that particular mutation is. I know it was recessive in my male, a ony 2 out of hundreds if not thousands of plants have shown it.

 

Pics

 

imgp5957z.jpg

 

imgp5959.jpg

 

imgp5989.jpg

 

 

 

Cheers

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Perhaps I should have kept it to see what it would have done. It came from the first batch og E$ko's C99 x SPG. Another one from the same pack came up self-topping as well. 1 leaf set then 2 branches....

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JWF - Interesting photo. The lemon thai male I used in the initial LT and Lemonberry cross carries that recessive trait. I have seen 1 female in each of the strains produce the "mohawk" flower. I'll go borrow a pic from MrGreenJeans, one of our beta testers. His LB looks almost identical to that. Seeing that same mutation makes me wonder how widespread that particular mutation is. I know it was recessive in my male, a ony 2 out of hundreds if not thousands of plants have shown it.

 

 

 

Thats interesting Useless and strangely enough I am growing one of your lemon thais as we speak. Its just gone in 12/12 but will look out for it if its in the Daddies recessive genes. I have also had a couple of plants in the past that have self topped, maybe this is a similar gene or possible a different way of achieving purpose; naturally multi cola plants maybe. I must say that particular plant was like smoking hemp but MrGreenJeans plant looks very resinous and tasty.

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Great thread with some interesting oddballs. Here's my entry.

 

Some time ago I traded one of my buds with a buddy for one he got from a dispensary in California. He said it was Train Wreck. It was a nice 4 inch cola top but it was uncured and dry as a bone. Really good high though. I found a solitary seed in it and stuck it away for a future grow.

 

When I got around to sprouting it I wasn't sure what to make of it. It was the oddest looking sprout I'd ever seen. The cotyledons appeared normal but instead of true leaves sprouting next there were 2 calyxes in their place. Those calyxes then morphed into funky leaves with a pistil sticking out the end. I was rather fascinated with her by then so I let her live. She just went to flower and is 21" tall after 5 weeks of veg. She looks quite normal now. Here are a few pics from sprout to 3 weeks.

 

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gallery_7905_3434_90574.jpg gallery_7905_3434_240571.jpg gallery_7905_3434_328957.jpg gallery_7905_3434_44297.jpg

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Useless, I believe what you're calling the Mohawk to be fasciation, a condition that causes the apical meristem to elongate in one direction. It's what gives cock's comb(celosia) its elongated appearance. Are her stems flattened as well?

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Useless, I believe what you're calling the Mohawk to be fasciation, a condition that causes the apical meristem to elongate in one direction. It's what gives cock's comb(celosia) its elongated appearance. Are her stems flattened as well?

 

She seems very normal now. Her stems are also normal appearing. Whatever it was at the begining she seems to have straightened out and I look forward to a productive flower.

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I hope its a female, I had train wreck from the dispensary for my 3rd time smoking.

Blew my mind I thought I could do the moonwalk forwards, its still in my top 2

Favorite smoke.

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She seems very normal now. Her stems are also normal appearing. Whatever it was at the begining she seems to have straightened out and I look forward to a productive flower.

 

I was asking Useless way above about his freaky fasciated bud, but that is good to hear that your plant straightened out! It's unbelievable the weird things plants will do and then get their act together and grow normally.

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