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Wrecks

2 stage harvest / light therapy

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This is an idea I had this morning after I smoked my first joint. It will be very easy to do, so I am going to do it. I don't know the inner workings of plant metabolism, but I think my theory is sound.

 

Target for my next round is 9 weeks. I'm going to buy a couple of liters of bottled water and pour it into a pot at 8 weeks, then pull all of the fans from my branches, razor/angle cut the stems, and immediately put them in that water, and keep them in flower for another +/-week.

 

I'm thinking this would use up all traces of nutes, and the "bud leaves" should lose a lot of chlorophyll. Maybe some early starch conversion, or some shit like that, you know.

 

It's gonna happen. Not saying it'll be mad potent, although this breed is no slouch, just the finest tasting pot on earth, that's all.

 

*edit*

I'll have to do a side by side, and leave some in the pots, as usual

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How about doing that to half the branches, and leave the other half on the plant for a normal finish? It's nice to be able to have a side by side comparison.

 

Are you in soil? I was talking about carbon-nitrogen ratios with the organic obsession dude. Adding a high carbon, low N substance to the soil that the microbes can chew on for a while should lock up almost all nutrients. Sugars, like molasses, would be used up too fast, because they're easy for microbes to eat and finish off before they start dying and releasing nutrients again.

 

If you mixed up some corn starch and water and poured it on, that should keep the microbes alive and busy for a longer time, probably over a week. Give them plain old water (assuming your tap water is "plain old" and not full of some mineral or another) and it should constitute a "flush." That's my hypothesis, anyway.

 

In my next grow I should have a few clones in there. Maybe I'll try a controlled experiment on clones from the same mother plant, see if I notice a difference.

 

EDIT: BTW, in the constant debate about clipping fan leaves and not clipping fan leaves, those not-blue hawaiians I'm growing are the classic non-branching, single cola structure and in two plants, the foliage is very heavy (BH2 and BH3 in my grow thread). Nearly all buds are covered by fan leaves, but those buds are swelling very nicely, and are covered with frost. I have to think clipping these fan leaves would be a detriment.

 

I'm thinking that when a fan leaf has a nice bud in the axil, rather than a branch, it should be kept for that bud's sake. If there's a fan leaf with a big branch coming out the axil, it's less important and should be clipped if it's covering buds.

 

That's one of this morning's random brain-farts. Thank you for listening.

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I'm thinking it can't hurt, anyway. I wouldn't want to do it too early, I know the need for food factory fans.

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Interesting idea. I wonder how it'll work in practice, though.

 

I can tell you a little bit based on what I know from the cut-flower biz side of things... this might help a little.

 

In plants that have a hollow stem and xylem in the outer tissue, you'll get two forms of water/nutrient uptake - the majority will come from the cut surfaces of the xylem, so you want the cut to be as clean as possible with minimal tissue tearing - a sanitized single-edge razor blade is perfect for this - you take your cuts one at a time and immediately immerse them in water to prevent any air bubbles from entering the tissue and blocking the flow of water upwards - after you've taken all of your cuts, you then re-cut them while they're under water at a 45 degree angle a bit higher up the stem - this will form a 'water-seal' to the new cut end and prevent any air bubbles from getting into the plant tissues. You'd then - ideally - transfer the newly-cut stem and flower to a container that has a sanitized water solution in it that will cover the stem to a depth of a few inches.

 

Here's where it gets kinda dicey, though. Normally, you'd want the solution to contain 3 basic components besides clean water - an acid of some sort to aid in preserving the tissue structure, a sugar to continue to feed the plant parts and flowers and a sanitizer that will keep bacteria from growing in the solution and blocking the xylem, preventing any uptake of water and/or nutrients. And you'd also want to change that solution out every day for the longest possible 'vase life' of the flowers. Without the preservative, sugars and sanitizer, you're more than likely going to see stem rot, the zylem will be blocked by bacteria that will flourish in the water and only the hollow stem will be left to transport whatever amount of solution that can be drawn upwards by capilary action - which might not be enough to keep the flowers from beginning to dry out and degrade. It's exactly for this reason that bouquets of flowers usually come with some form of floral preservative that can be mixed into the vase - it lengthens the 'life' of the floral arrangement by slowing the breakdown of the stem tissues, giving the plant something to feed on and keeping the water from turning into a nasty, slimy bacterial 'soup' while in the container.

 

You can probably get away with it for a few days by using distilled or pre-boiled water and adding a bit of an acid/sugar solution to the water that you'll keep the stems in - something like commercial lemon juice and some pre-dissolved table sugar - or maybe a tablespoon or two of commercial soda pop that contains phosphoric or citric acid and HFC or sugar - but you'll still want to change that out each day for fresh solution - and you still have no real sanitizing agent in the water to prevent a bloom of bacteria or algae from glopping up the works.

 

Not to mention that most florists will tell you that for the longest vase life of the plant, you want to keep them out of strong, direct light and high temperatures - not only to preserve the plant tissues and keep the flowers from drying out, but to keep any bacterial or algal growth in the water at as low a level as possible.

 

I'm not saying it won't work, but this almost seems more like what I've heard of as a 'water cure' in a way - to lessen the aromas and the chlorophyls from the plant to soften the flavors and reduce harshness in the smoke. (It also kind of reminds me of the technique known as 'retting' which is used to break down plant tissues in preparation of using the plant in fiber production - a kind of controlled decomposition of the plant using water and bacteria).

 

If you do decide to do this, I'd love to see a thread on it to see how it progresses - purely a scientific interest in things like this. I'd be a bit leary to try it myself on any plant of value - but it sounds like something to play with if you have stems with popcorn that you were gonna toss away of just use for HO production or the like.

 

In any case... keep us updated if you decide to take the plunge.

 

Peace,

 

BB

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I'm stoned, so it took me a couple of reads to get up to speed on what you are talking about. How 'bout biochar? I do not have a link, however, at some uni hort site I read that biochar can actually pull nitrogen from plants... this is why you should always presoak, or charge it with a nitrogen source, otherwise they will find it and suck it from your plants... or so I read. No personal experience.

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My failing before has been trying too many new things at once.

 

This will be simple. Strip fans / cut stem like fresh flowers / put in water for a few days before final trim.

 

My main objective is to lower chlorophyll levels right at the end.

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My failing before has been trying too many new things at once. This will be simple. Strip fans / cut stem like fresh flowers / put in water for a few days before final trim. My main objective is to lower chlorophyll levels right at the end.
Wrecks... you might find this discussion on 'water curing' interesting - I've tried it with some lower branch popcorn that I could afford to sacrifice for the benefit of scientific inquiry - it certainly did change the entire flavor and aroma profile as well as the color of the finished product - it really wasn't to my taste (hah!) but I can see why some folks would use this as an alternative to a traditional air cure.

 

Keep us informed - I'm interested to see how it works out for you.

 

BB

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I think the technique Wrecks is describing is a bit different than this water cure technique. I wonder why anyone would want bud with less flavor and aroma, seems like I want more flavors and aromas.

 

Good luck and I will be checking out a log if you make one, good luck and b safe.

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Right, Starinhazy. The flowers themselves will never touch water. Just like fresh cut flowers in a vase.

I'll do half like that and half regular style, unless I have a house fire, or some crazy shit.

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Sounds like an interesting experiment. I was thinking something like a mini hempy with some biochar and water to pull out any remaining nitrogen as it is an essential element in chlorophyll.

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i for one can say that i have done this in the past. change the water daily and ur good. this is a rush flush. must change the water daily, one plant per bucket. when i came to america my granny started using miracle gro on her buds and she always said this is the only way to flush miracle gro out the buds because of time release. ive done this to indoor soil plants i didnt realize was gonna finish so soon. forgot to say, add a airstone to the water.

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