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What's better, granular hydroponic fertilizer plant food, or liquid?

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Guest gem10.com

I prefer granular myself because I don't like buying water, and granular fertilizer is in it's dry non-reactive state.

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I never have used granular fert on my plants ever.

 

use to use some on my veg. garden but got away from that.

 

good luck in your venture.

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Granular/dry is the only way in my opinion...

 

Why pay for mostly water, fancy bottle, and label when you can mix up your own for a fraction of the cost. I pay about $90 for 50 lbs of fertilizer! Using a spreadsheet style nutrient calculator (Hydrobuddy), I mix up my own from compounds (Calcium Nitrate, Magnesium Sulfate, MKP...) When it's all said and done it comes out to less than 1/10 of $.01 per gallon of mixed nutrient.

 

Ask yourself why do all the nutrient companies have all these boosters/additives? Because the base nutrients are not complete. Nothing more than trying to steal your hard earned money!!

 

Learn how to mix up your own. It's fun to do, and will save you thousands of dollars.

 

Be well,

 

alaskagrown

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couldn't agree more with some of the consensus here. I started mixing mine about 2 years ago, not spending my $$ on water from somewhere else, I can use my boiled RO and save. I buy premixed powders, and they have produced over and over for me, no regrets on dumping all the marketing and water.

 

Best of luck, don't take my word for it, check some logs and see they work great.

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If this pertains to hydroponic growing, i prefer liquids in aeroponics as they wont clog sprayers or gunk up the pump. I have used powdered form in soil with good results in the past and could imagine it working in nft or wilma type systems but when i tried it in aero, either most of it was insoluble and/or created slime.

 

best vybez and cool topic

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Starin. I am with u on the powdered stuff.. that is what I use when mixing my 0-50-30 2 times during flowering.....bloom boosters work..lol

 

lot of difference in powdered than granular..lol

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That stuff I buy, liquid, you have to mix with water, it is concentrate without the water :) . Never used it on mj plants, powder, but used to love it on my outdoor gardens because of the time release. Personally for hydro I would prefer liquid.

 

Best hands down, if we made our own compost and soil, we don't need added ferts. One day :)

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Difference between granular and powdered? Granular reminds me of the brown crystalline salts (made by Eco Enterprises) I bought at Indoor Sun Shoppe back in 1981. I was mixing half gallons of nute solution for a Colombian Gold plant in a SWC gravel bed--swore I would never hand mix nutes again!

 

General Hydroponics has a prilling technique that makes the all-in-one MaxiGro and MaxiBloom quite soluble. Jack's (two part plus epsom) isn't bad but I didn't like the solubility of Veg+Bloom very much (but that was an early production run).

 

A few years ago, I was planning a DWC grow and bought the liquid GH per the Lucas formula. I ended up giving it to my friend who liked it in soil. MaxiBloom is said to be Lucas formula in solid form. Works for me.

 

I've used liquid Alaska Fish and Alaska Morbloom in pots of amended soil with good results. It stinks but works great all around the house and garden--it was good enough for mom. http://www.lillymiller.com/alaska.html

 

Edit: by granular, do you mean the time-release stuff like Miracle-Gro? I may have used it on some Colombian plants in the '70s but I wouldn't do that today.

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If this pertains to hydroponic growing, i prefer liquids in aeroponics as they wont clog sprayers or gunk up the pump. I have used powdered form in soil with good results in the past and could imagine it working in nft or wilma type systems but when i tried it in aero, either most of it was insoluble and/or created slime.

 

best vybez and cool topic

 

 

I use granular/powder for aeroponics, have for many years. The key to clean water, misters...is using a organic digester enzyme (Pondzyme...) Works extremely well, and one $20 container will treat 12,000 gallons. :)

 

Be well

 

alaskagrown

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Guest gem10.com

Difference between granular and powdered? Granular reminds me of the brown crystalline salts (made by Eco Enterprises) I bought at Indoor Sun Shoppe back in 1981. I was mixing half gallons of nute solution for a Colombian Gold plant in a SWC gravel bed--swore I would never hand mix nutes again!

 

General Hydroponics has a prilling technique that makes the all-in-one MaxiGro and MaxiBloom quite soluble. Jack's (two part plus epsom) isn't bad but I didn't like the solubility of Veg+Bloom very much (but that was an early production run).

 

A few years ago, I was planning a DWC grow and bought the liquid GH per the Lucas formula. I ended up giving it to my friend who liked it in soil. MaxiBloom is said to be Lucas formula in solid form. Works for me.

 

I've used liquid Alaska Fish and Alaska Morbloom in pots of amended soil with good results. It stinks but works great all around the house and garden--it was good enough for mom. http://www.lillymiller.com/alaska.html

 

Edit: by granular, do you mean the time-release stuff like Miracle-Gro? I may have used it on some Colombian plants in the '70s but I wouldn't do that today.

By granular I also mean 100% water soluble.

 

If this pertains to hydroponic growing, i prefer liquids in aeroponics as they wont clog sprayers or gunk up the pump. I have used powdered form in soil with good results in the past and could imagine it working in nft or wilma type systems but when i tried it in aero, either most of it was insoluble and/or created slime.

 

best vybez and cool topic

This might not happen with highly soluble ingredients, there are different grades and some grades are not viable.

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When I did mess with hydro I was using Jacks Two Part.

 

I like mixing stuff, I can make any strength in whatever balance and add the micros as needed.

 

I used bubblers a few times when I had to scrap and start over to bring mother plants up to speed but I never flower in hydro.

 

I am still a hard core soil grower.

 

The flavor of the rich soil biome here in the west coast is something even a tank of fish and plankton can't replicate.

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I think people always think that when you buy liquid nutrients your buying water. Fact remains all that water has nutrients in it, Shaken well every drop has nutrients .

 

some choose to use dry salts other use liquids .. there is benefits both ways as well as shitty benefits some mixed dry salt do not dissolve these are fillers they do nothing.

but also create salt build up over time .

 

Its like saying because you made a compost tea its better then actual compost,

truth is its not.

Its actually watered back nutrients.

 

But in chemical liquid nutrients its high EC value that needs watering back its mixed and dissolved in some cases when dealing with dry base salts it takes for ever to properly dissolve, Because of the colder temps of the water your mixing then feeding the plants

 

Anyways presently using Cultured solutions and seeing unreal growth and health final goal 30 plant 60 pound harvest

 

 

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Lots of opinions. So here is better.

 

Go see what professional green house farmers use and their systems and why. I dont want to write a book so I will say your answer is in finding that information.

 

Now, many work but people need to stop being educated by sellers and fucking learn something for once. No insult but if its true that all you know of plant nutrition is from forums and nutrition companies. Please, other than showing and discussing what works for you, please dont speak as knowledgeable person in this as you are not.

 

I write from the perspective that cleans up that mess by helping those who follow rather than learn about growing and have issues.

 

Now though, the answer is also not so simple. What you know, your skills, your appreciation can or cannot make one nutrient system better for one grower than another for varied reasons from person to person to setup to setup differences.

 

Educate yourself on plant environment (temp & humidity), lighting (spectrum & intensity and types of lights/bulbs/ballasts and about them) nutrition, physiology and lets toss management aspects in just to be cool.

 

Do that to a competent level and no real growing trick or secret will be hid from you.

 

PS: The answer is what nutrient system best matches your situation (skill level and such, no one specific answer is right without taking your unique aspects into consideration.) If I was to say 100% one is better over the other in all situations you should never give me your time again.

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Jacks 5-12-26 and calcium nitrate, Jacks 10-30-20 blossom booster and Jacks 20-20-20 can't beat the price or the results.

Economically feasible and sustainable no matter what your budget.

A friend or ours she works at a nursery here and has been there forever they also have a sister nursery in the USA and that's all they have ever used.

They nursery uses the 20-20-20 and 10-30-20 for their flowers and vegetables.

I use the 5-12-26 and calnit and the 10-30-20 for all my coco grows.

I also use the 20-20-20 and 10-30-20 for my flowers and vegetable gardens.

Dry ferts all the way!!!!!

Baught into the liquid fert hype once and once only then our friend came over laughed at me and proceeded to smack me upside the head and started to educate me about fertilizers.

Never looked back at a bottle of liquid nutes again.

 

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Regarding salts: I learned a lesson that when I learned it I felt entirely stupid. When it comes to quality of ingredients of salts look for "food grade" or "pharmaceutical grade" ingredients.

 

Agriculture grade = about the worst there is and is where I stumbled in my early fertilizer understanding.

 

Jacks is a good proven salt used in the professional green house industry. In addition I offer the following along those lines, though veg & bloom is new to the market but I have seen this product in various setups and is warranted for the list.

 

High end salts. I add for input to discussion are not direct endorsement though I do like them.

In my view, those are some of if not the best high grade fertilizer salts available that easily dissolve in regularly used temperatures..

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I have to say those are all good dry options, never heard of veg + bloom or Haifa group.

Yeah dry ferts all the way, add RO water and make your own stock solutions and away you go.

 

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