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DevilSeed

help - very slow growth on my 10 sugar punch in veg

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I had to transplant from 6 liter into 30 liter pots, and as my plants grew very tall I decided to twist and curl the stems downwards into a spiral type shape and tie them down to widen the canopy and also lower it.

 

I done this 3 days ago and the growth seems to have slowed down or maybe stopped completely and isn't picking up.

 

None of the branches were bent or folded over so I didn't think the plant would be too stressed by it

 

Is this slow growth because of

 

1) stress caused with the twisting and curling

2) downards spiral direction of branches stopping nutrients being delivered to the leafs

3) transplanting into bigger pots

4) all of the above

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I had to transplant from 6 liter into 30 liter pots, and as my plants grew very tall I decided to twist and curl the stems downwards into a spiral type shape and tie them down to widen the canopy and also lower it.

 

I done this 3 days ago and the growth seems to have slowed down or maybe stopped completely and isn't picking up.

 

None of the branches were bent or folded over so I didn't think the plant would be too stressed by it

 

Is this slow growth because of

 

1) stress caused with the twisting and curling

2) downards spiral direction of branches stopping nutrients being delivered to the leafs

3) transplanting into bigger pots

4) all of the above

 

I would suspect the stress of transplant and training them to grow into a spiral "LST" slowed them a bit. With my plants, I did notice when I transplanted and tied them down the slowed for a few days. The roots are probably starting to fill into the new soil, and the plants are no longer sending energy to the top....everything horizontal or close is a top now. I think you should start seeing a heavy growth kick up in another couple of days. By no means am I an expert..lol...but from my experience and research I think everything will be fine.

 

Also, Hempyfan will most likely jump in and explain it all in more scientific terms...what, why and how...he is priceless

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Growing in bigger pots of soil makes it tougher to determine if you have watered the plants sufficiently. Most likely the roots cannot reach the moist because there is so much more medium. Try watering around the stem with a half liter water every day until you see growth.

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I had to transplant from 6 liter into 30 liter pots,

 

Sounds like they are stalling due to putting new roots in to those larger pots (quite a jump, 6 to 30). Should be AOK in about a week once they've put their new boots down...

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I agree with plant getting accustomed to new container and is making new roots.

 

Hamme is spot on regarding the watering. Water from the edge to get the roots to seek out water away from the main stem.

  • It can take a minute but within a week you should see growth return. I would wait on further manipulating the plants until they get their new feet.

Sometimes you will get a plant that does not want to be LST or is sensitive to other type of manipulations. But sugar punch can take it.

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Hi all.

 

Thanks for the response, in this case we can rule out any underwatering issues as the medium was very sufficiently watered as it rained the day before transplanting and my soil got a bit too wet.

 

Again today I hate to say it but they look just the same as yesterday...

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Three days? lol. Dude, take a valium and relax, all is one with the universe! Three days is not long enough to determine new growth after super cropping and transplant.

 

I, for one, do not buy the "transplant shock" theory, as if done properly, the plant won't even know it's been moved, the "shock" comes from changing soil, not watering in properly, or dicking up the root ball when placing in new pots. Think of it this way, if all you're doing is placing an UNDISTURBED root ball, the shape of your last pot, into a larger pot with the exact same medium, why should anybody be "shocked"? Watched Grandma do this for decades with roses, tomatoes, peppers, you name it. Never did she think of "shock". I agree with what Hempy says, however.

 

I've transplanted back and forth from hydro to soil, soil to hydro, about every which way imaginable, and first off, you don't dick around with watering when you transplant, you water them in WELL, it's not a time for the plant roots to "search out water", THAT will cause stress. Plants don't just need water, they need the oxygen the water carries to the root zone, every time you water, you are oxygenating the roots, which is why transplant is no time to skimp on watering. Just transplant them into the larger containers, water WELL with THE SAME nutrient mix you've been using, and leave them alone, they'll do fine. When they begin to dry out, THEN water around the edges. Besides, if you're using any quality mix, i.e., HP ProMIx, Happy

Frog, etc, plenty of perlite, very loose, it should be virtually impossible to overwater your plants. The reason you're not seeing new growth, is because when you bend a stem lower than the other, the meristem changes, and auxins flow to the highest tips. Growth HAS NOT stopped, or even slowed, you're just not seeing it in height, yet as the plant redirects it's energy, and that's not shock, it's life!

 

See "3 days" above!!. I predict a great harvest in your future. :)

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Thanks for the post diesel, I'm not fully sure what it is, but I do think growth has slowed/stopped. The tops on vertical stems would grow wider, now the stems are horizontal the tops have changed to face upwards where the light is but they are not getting wider.

I did not believe in plant shock so much in the past, but now experiencing this it does seem to me like the plant has gone into maintenance mode.

 

Maybe I should water some more?

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For my gardens, I always used Botanical care liquid products. Mixing to the PPM's of their current age or the season, (veg,transition, or flower.

I also keep a bubbling tea ready to apply.

 

So my way, was to water/feed/tea/or plain water them 3 different ways through out the cycle.

Once from the top down, until you see runoff in your saucer.

 

I also prefer saucers that are extra large, a 12 gallon saucer to a 10 gallon pot.

 

Once dried out properly, the next water/feed/tea/ or water application is simply filling up the saucer and allowing the wicking action up take into the medium.

 

Once dried out properly, and ready for water/feed/tea/plain water, it comes from the top down and saucer filling.

 

Once each month, whether vegging, or in transition, or in flower the pot is set on net pots, and I flood them with about a gallon of water,(more if needed) and check run off.

If a high number, I did a piss poor job of nutrient management.

If well below the PPM's I fed, then I pat myself on the back for a fine, well done job of medium management.

 

I've never seen transplant shock, and am a firm believer in building a better root mass with 3-4 up potting through out the cycle.

Supercropping can shock them, but I usually saw that if I did not beef up the veg PPM's before hand.

 

We all have our ways with our fav's.

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I would water well but not too often.

Wire her branches up in place.

Give her 10 days to relax with out expectations.

:wave:

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OK, on closer inspection I think that growth is normal, the difference now is growth appearing on many different budsites compared to to 6 or so so each site fattening slower but more overall

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As I read the above posts, I'd say your questions have been answered.

 

Proper transplanting should cause no stress to the plant whatsoever. Cannabis is a fairly resilient plant and can take a lot of abuse.

Cannabis can even be transplanted like new roses are... bareroot, and without wilt.

 

About the only thing I would venture to add, would be to top water for about 10-14 days, then start to bottom water your plants until top growth has resumed.

 

Bottom watering will allow the roots to "search" for water and fill in the new container more efficiently and with greater root volume. Bottom watering creates a wicking action instead of a capillary action... both add needed oxygen to the soil for the roots.

 

As for twisting the stem... this actually could slow down growth. Anything that damages the internal workings of the plants vascular system (xylem, floem, cambium) can stunt growth until the plant corrects itself... if possible.

 

I'm sure most here have seen, in person or in pics, plants that were tied so tightly that the plants growth caused them to gird themselves and everything above that area died. Twisting the stems can have the same effect by destroying the inner workings of the cambium layer where the plants vascular system lies.

Luckily, plants can fix themselves in most instances if you let them.

 

Nothing happens quickly with plants, you have to be patient.

 

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If all went well with the transplanting, it is probably just as you say — with all sorts of new growing points exposed to light, growth is no longer concentrated at a few top growing points. As the plant gets bigger, both above and below ground, it will speed up.

 

I've had transplant shock many times, but it's usually over in a few hours to a day.

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Sounds like it's a mix between transplant shock and the shock of them being tied down as all the energy was in the top bud is now being split between the top and middle half of the plant, and also she has to anchor her self into the new soil which takes energy, give it a week to 10 days and she will shoot off again, I always do scrog so I see this all the time when I top the plant and then weave her through the net, don't worry she will bounce back

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Clone and diesel are too funny haha :dribble:

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