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jamaican bud

starting my journey to the land of organics

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hello fellow og family. hope all is well with everyone. Im starting my journey to organics. I'm just tired of the bs that comes with the damn synthetics now. still gonna give sannies mix a try next run, but this run I'm diving into the coot mix. i see lots of people on the site is familiar with this style grow. agp wassup, i see you. organic obsession, shoeless, y'all doing y'all thing. just wanna make sure I'm getting started off on the right foot. gonna be using sphagnum peat moss, 1:1 compost/castings, 1:1 rice hulls/pumice. making bout 13 cu ft. got the coot mix from another site. according to them theres no need to let the soil cook after mixing, but still gonna sit for bout a week give or take. was talking to the company and told them i was planning on running 20 5gallon buckets. they said they wouldn't advise doing that, but would recommend using atleast 15 gal buckets. sucks as i already have about 40 5 gallon buckets ( kicks myself for runnings sannies stuff at that point lol). wish me luck on this run. I'm mixing the soil tomorrow. probably planting bout thursday. strains are 88 ghash x neville super kush, f13 x chem d, and fire alien kush. pics coming soon. any advice would be greatly appreciated

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I see no reason why a 5 gallon would not work. Seems so odd they would say that so I am thinking I am missing something.

 

Keep your castings at around 10 to 20 percent of your mix overall. You get to a point of no return and can actually make things worse but frankly I have used far greater % in the past with no issues but I give the best practice advice. You can top dress with castings once a month throughout the grow as well.

 

I would add some biochar to the mix, be sure to inoculate it.

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hempy whats going on. same thing i said. to the point of me even asking the guy how bout if i was to throw 3 plants in the 15 gal to get the same amount of plants in that i wanted, he said only 1 plant per 15 gal tub. cool so now that i know i could run the 5 gals thats a huge weight lifted off my shoulders. if my calculations serve me correctly, castings would be about 17% of the total mix. glad I'm in the right range. would u recommend top dressing or making teas? or both? gotta build me one of those ACT devices soon. also, i was listening to a podcast with coot on it. he was against using bio char stating that theres no real need as its not really what they say it is. imma search for the file and get back to ya on that. cant remember exactly what was said. i was so for bio char until i heard that.

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In that is likely everything you want to know and then some. I would top dress and use teas but check out all that information and then I can better help when you have a question.

 

The aspect of biochar can be partially true as it depends on the use. For a one and done with soil, I agree it is not needed but for reusing soil, it is a must in my book! As everything their is often half truths in pod casts and such as only so much time.

 

In these compilations I have tried very hard to give complete information in easy to understand method to the way to much.

http://culturalhealingandlife.com.www413.your-server.de/index.php?/forum/4-garden-earth/

 

Let me know of any questions though after Monday I will be offline for a bit and unsure how long.

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think i may have it confused. excuse me as all this organic terminology is new to me. i see that about 6:00 he reference forest humus is nothing more than a code word for saw dust due to the fact that they aren't allowed to harvest but so much legally and still have a year round demand to meet.

 

on that note, i will be purchasing it, cause like you said, its a once and done situation. could only help it either way u look at it.

 

i love that link bro. sooo much info. gonna be digging in it tonight. do appreciate the help hempy. i too am i hempy fan. this organic grow will be the first grow in years thats not hempy buckets. love them.

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Hi JB

Welcome to the organic club

 

I fine smoother smoke and better taste

 

 

I also top dress and use teas as well

 

The mix I use I let cook for about a month

 

Good luck bro

Peace

Papalag

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I do not agree with much of what they say on many levels but they are not wholly wrong either.

 

Using forest compost and sea compost is your best practice for us, we want a fungal and bacterial component.

  • Generally you want a % of brown and green overall and does not wholly matter where that comes from, generically stated. To help learning, I will let that stand so that people can search what brown and green means in composting ingredients.
  • However finished forest compost and finished sea compost is spot when mixed together as a single compost.

If you look at the compost postings in the link I posted their is no better knowledge in my view.

  • Search Elaine Ingham in regards to compost. She is one of the leading edges of knowledge on that.

My knowledge does not generally come from a cannabis background but a horticultural one. A vast majority of cannabis teaching is not whole and/or is corrupt..

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Welcome to the "Light" side Jamaican! I'll agree to all above. I'd love to grow in 15 gallon, too, but they would be trees. So, kind of depends on that for me. I was wondering if you were growing inside or outdoors. Must be outside for him to say that. If you were using buckets and not air pots, outside, you might cook your roots... I've done that. Air pots are great, but take much more water. I use 5 gal smart pots right now and I water a gallon a day outside.

 

You'll find that once you get some of the organics philosophy down, it's actually much easier and less feeding than synthetics. I just started last year myself and it makes so much sense, and the better we get at understanding, much of the organic ingredients can be had for free or much cheaper if you learn where to find them in nature.

 

Good luck and best vibes, bro. I think you'll be hooked like the rest of us. I still have much to learn, but the journey is a blast, and the resulting smoke is awesome.

 

PeAce

 

MrG

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Hi Jamaican.

 

Organic is the only way to grow, not only will you have a far superior product it's far less hassle than Hydro, the plants grow themselves. My only advice would be not to get too sucked into believing you need to have a list of ingredients as long as your arm to get good results. I'm a firm believer of "less is more", sure a good soil mix is good & if you're growing outdoors in depleted soil. I see lots of Living soil mixes but I haven't seen anything on here about bokashi, I may have overlooked it though. Bokashi is probably suited for outdoors better but it's amazing what it can do! You can grow a crop outside from start to finish using only water & some compost.

 

Linky

 

https://www.humboldtseeds.net/en/blog/understanding-how-bokashi-works/

 

Peace

 

B.

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I agree with Buubla... less is more. I use a dry mix for amending (Roots Uprising line), as it has all of the raw ingredients without having to buy and mix all the parts, and only do some liquids on occasion and around late bloom. If your soil is right, and the microbes are healthy, they will take the right nutrients when they need them, rather than force feeding them. It also goes a looong way.

 

Peace

 

mrG

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Organics is the way to go!

 

I think they recommend the big pots if you're going to have a living soil, so there are parts of the large soil bed that don't experiences as much of a dry/wet cycle, and there is more room for critters like composting worms. I grew with 30gal bags and it was awesome, 2 plants per bag (at the end).

 

But actively aerated teas and homemade worm poop is definitely, definitely the way to go.

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Being very cheap the soils i look for are what is growing green while summer heat burns, that stand of brush holding up well, then i go dig up some of that soil for whatever reason its fertile , i ask no questions, i get a good load of worms too. that might be the trick.

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What master is the key to gardening? SHIT!...Master, I am sorry to have disturbed you . No Grasshopper you have asked a question i have given the answer. SHIT, bat, cat ,rat cow wombat, its all good.

 

EM.....good bugs........

This is a recipe

 

EM/BAM: (lactobacillus culture)

 

1/4 cup rice

 

1quart Mason Jar

 

1 cup water

 

1 fine mesh strainer

 

80 oz milk depends on how much one is making

 

1 gallon container or jar

 

1 tsp. black-strap molasses

 

Procedure:

 

1. Place rice and cup of water in mason jar and shake vigorously until water is cloudy white, strain off rice kernels and discard into tour compost bin or cook for dinner. I have heard of the Japanese adding a dash of nato to help ferment but not needed.

 

 

 

2. place cap on loosely and store in a cabinet or cool dark place for 5-7 days.

 

3. Sift off top layer and strain liquid (serum)

 

4. measure your rice liquid and now add a ratio of 1 part fermented rice to 10 parts milk, I would culture in a 1 gallon jar. let sit for 5-7 days.

 

 

Rice water and milk serum fermenting 3 days – notice lid is only siting on top as to not build pressure.

5. sift off curd settlement and add to your soil or feed your animals it is good for their digestion, then there should be a light yellow serum left this is your unactivated serum.

 

6. Add 1 tsp molasses to feed and keep your bacteria alive and refrigerate. should have a shelf life of 6-12 months.

 

7. to activate microorganism activities and to room temperature non-chlorinated water at a ratio of 1 part Serum to 20 parts water.

 

8. feed to plants either straight into soil or follicular feeding. .

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