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tacman7

No Till Raised Bed Methodology

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So I want to quit using pots because I can't do all the lifting to transplant.

I've watched a few vids but not sure exactly what I need to do.

I will build some sort of beds with steel mesh bottoms to sit on the ground in my greenhouse.

Then fill them up and add worms. I plan on skipping Winter grow and make these boxes.

I would then fill them and add worms and let them get working so they would be ready for next Summer.

 

So I only have a general outline of what to do, appreciate help from someone who's used this method etc.

I have last seasons dirt and I would buy some new stuff to add to it.

Ocean Forest?

 

Any help appreciated!

Thanks

 

 

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If your pots are big enough, couldnt you go no till and then without switching to a raised bed not have to pick them up?...  I think one guy here uses 20 gallon rubbermaid totes. Myself I am experimenting with using 7 gallon air pots in place, just amending the soil.  Bout to start my second run in it. 

? maybe i do not understand your problem?

DB

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I like the looks of the raised beds, guess I have to do a lot more reading.

Like in this link taken from the next thread here:

https://www.cannabisfabricpots.com/blog/no-till-cover-cropping-and-top-dressing-with-brownguy420/

They use crimson clover to grow off season to enhance the soil. Going to try that.

 

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Tacman, good vid, thanks. He sure makes it sound pretty simple. Doing it the way nature intended but with a little kick start. 

I have an uncle that's in his mid 80's and uses concrete manhole sleeves for his raised veggie garden. They are 4' tall and 4' in diameter. He owns an engineering company and were left over from a job site. Think he has 6 or 8. They are pretty expensive, so not an option for most of us, but thought it was an amazing idea when I first saw them. Having the soil level at 4 feet high makes for extremely easy gardening for him and his wife. No bending at all, he can pull his side by side right up next to them and use the back as a little work station. He has his drip lines run up from the bottom and works perfect. Anyways, just thought this could spark a few ideas for you. Not sure on your budget, but a fairly inexpensive option is to use sand/earth bags and stack them like bricks to form your beds. This would allow you to get creative with the design. 

Good luck bro, hope it turns out great for you. 

 

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Thanks!

 

Yeah, I think it will work out. I'm going to use old dirt with amendments and grow clover on it this Winter. Along with add earth worms.

I think I should still be able to use General Organics nutrients maybe, at a reduced level maybe. Have to see how that goes.

I've had really good luck with them, no ph' ing with it either.

 

 

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Hey tacman7,

Not sure if helpful but I've been growing in my outdoor raised beds for the last three years with what I think are ok results anyway. I just filled with my natural soil on my block which was pretty high clay content, mixed through a bunch of manure, home made compost and castings, and little bits of whatever else I think I need (this year have added some rock dust to try). The worms also seemed to come naturally when everything was sweet. Never really worry about Ph and mostly just water with straight tap or rain water, sometimes adding seasol and maybe adding very small amounts of liquid food during flowering, and always covered with Hay maybe 80mm which just breaks down beautifully every year. 

I then top them up slightly every season by just adding more of the same if I think they need it. I had a "golden bed" for 2 years, whatever I planted in it went absolutely nuts but it acted and looked a bit depleted this year so have added a bit extra. I would prefer my raised beds were a little higher is all, just for ease of use (less bending over) and because the clay ground is so hard underneath the beds for the roots to penetrate. I probably should have gone a plank more but it's all good. I was actually turning the soil every year previously but am going to try just adding layers from now on.

Cheers

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On 1/1/2019 at 5:44 AM, Halforc said:

I would prefer my raised beds were a little higher is all,

Hey Halforc, I to have been looking into raised beds, how tall are yours now? 

This is what we going to copy, and I'll put my own stank on it, as I can by a lot of vegetables at all the farmers markets for $1900.00 they want for that beauty.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj5aBW2n8xcaNjEw-wEgBhtAPOynIjMU1rZ6Vzu2sD-ftHlCTkyiDPyTHQApDmhxgW86Vof79l0uzek_aD-wT3aUgxmerAK347GiWYKwuO&usqp=CAY

I still have some skins from my pole building to use for the sides. But I think 30" to shallow, and that is why I asked Halforc the depth of his.

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7 hours ago, webeblzr said:

Hey Halforc, I to have been looking into raised beds, how tall are yours now? 

This is what we going to copy, and I'll put my own stank on it, as I can by a lot of vegetables at all the farmers markets for $1900.00 they want for that beauty.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj5aBW2n8xcaNjEw-wEgBhtAPOynIjMU1rZ6Vzu2sD-ftHlCTkyiDPyTHQApDmhxgW86Vof79l0uzek_aD-wT3aUgxmerAK347GiWYKwuO&usqp=CAY

I still have some skins from my pole building to use for the sides. But I think 30" to shallow, and that is why I asked Halforc the depth of his.

Hey webeblzr sorry mate I couldn't see your photo, probably a problem with my computer.

Basically mine are pretty short mate, probably only in the 12 to 20 inch range, but they are also floorless which allows the roots to penetrate deeper into the earth anyway if they'd like to. One of the reasons that they are short is because the taller they are, the higher my plants will be, and I have some 'issues' around here so I don't need them poking above my fence lol!

The other dimensions of the beds are about 3 to 4 foot in width and maybe 4 to 8ft in length, depending on the bed and I've grown some pretty big girls in them, to my standards anyway haha. The biggest being maybe a 9 ft sleestack and some biggish SugarPunch in the 8 ft range. I always bend the big girls over and pin them to reduce height too. Just beautiful plants though. I also have an old enamelled steel bath which I use as another bed which works great! 

In my limited experience, i think your 30 inch beds will be plenty deep enough, and definitely a good height for tending the girls and I reckon they will absolutely love all of that space to spread their roots!

Hope that helps a little anyway bro.

Cheers

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Hey Halforc,  Thank you for replying. I'll be using this for my vegetable garden, since I do not like live in a free state. I got to keep the ladies in the the dark, in unseen places. 

When I saw this garden for sale, I loved the idea, but it's way out of my price range. The wife and I are getting to the age, if we can garden upright, we will be doing it longer. Last year to so, we let the weeds get away from us, so looking at raised beds. 

We have deer like many places got rabbits, so the fence above is needed for that and vine running plants.

Thanks again.

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yup, i definitely need to move my girls into dark, unseen places too... I just love growing under the sun, but not nice always looking over shoulder. Cheers mate, I try to grow a lot of herbs and veggies too.

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I have two boxes built and two more almost built then I need to fill them to get rid of dirt so I can have space to build the last two.

These are about knee high. Any higher than that and I have problems with the plants hitting the ceiling, least I hope I have that problem.

6 boxes with 4 plants each = 24 plants = legal limit. They can be big though.

Taking me more time than I thought. I'm slow.

Interesting info Halforc, I want to use some of what I used to use but my cousin who's growing the worms warns against too many nutes or worms could die.

Lot to think about. So going to be like making a lasagna, just not sure about which layer goes where etc.  

 

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Looking great man. I have a book on Lasagna gardening if you want me to list a diagram of the layers. I have to go dig it out but I think it's close. I've been looking for Dutch White Clover locally to use for no till around here. Nobody has it yet but one new place said she would get it for me. It's the cover crop for future nutrients. 

Hey Webe, If you could afford the dirt to get the height, I think higher is better like maybe 3 feet or more. That makes for less bending but also depends on the type of crop at harvest. wouldn't want to have to have a ladder to get your tomatoes from your indeterminate plants. So, comfort and root space is the benefit I guess. The soil is also going to compact over a short time and you lose space that way. The lady here built her's about 18-20 inches high and it works fine but I would enjoy it about a foot higher. That takes more dirt to fill and keep full. 

I'm thinking of moving all of mine and rebuilding them, all a little higher. I should research it a little. I want to get mine more consolidated and then slowly build some sun shade screen above it all. Our sun is super intense at 6500 foot elevation plus we get a lot of hail storms in summer. It would be an investment but a good one if I'm going to try and produce some quantities of food. 

I also want to make an area of raised bed cannabis pods like out in Cali. They use the super large fabric pots and no till method and do one tree per pod. That may not be practical for me here, lol, but maybe a couple or three smaller ones in a corner of my property. I'm definitely going to grow clover on my beds and outdoor cannabis spots. I'm raising worms now and will incorporate that and homemade living soil eventually. I'm enjoying learning it all and so happy to finally have a place to do it without having to move and leave all my hard work for someone else. 

Spring is almost here! 

peace

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With no till you have to be careful with the soil becoming compact.  Failure with this and you will see problems starting with build up ammonia from nitrogen cycle and then domino effect with potential other issues.

Have happy worms in soil, keep soil covered with compost (mushroom compost as well as sea and forest compost with some work castings) and water overtop this compost.

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Hey MrG. If you have a Southern States or Colorado equivalent they may have Dutch White Clover. It's been a couple of years, but I bought a 3# bag from there, though I don't remember the time of year. It's what you see growing in my bags with the good stuff.

Don't forget about Crimson clover for a cover crop. No good for indoors, great on our outdoor veggie plot.  And you need to plant some Bocking 14 comfrey. Very beneficial plant for us and our gardens.

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No need for bottle nutes in no till

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4 hours ago, Shoeless said:

Hey MrG. If you have a Southern States or Colorado equivalent they may have Dutch White Clover. It's been a couple of years, but I bought a 3# bag from there, though I don't remember the time of year. It's what you see growing in my bags with the good stuff.

Don't forget about Crimson clover for a cover crop. No good for indoors, great on our outdoor veggie plot.  And you need to plant some Bocking 14 comfrey. Very beneficial plant for us and our gardens.

He's lucky as shit, only lives an hours drive from Build a Soil, Inc. the best LOS supplier on the planet.

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6 hours ago, Hempyfan said:

With no till you have to be careful with the soil becoming compact.  Failure with this and you will see problems starting with build up ammonia from nitrogen cycle and then domino effect with potential other issues.

Have happy worms in soil, keep soil covered with compost (mushroom compost as well as sea and forest compost with some work castings) and water overtop this compost.

Isn't the Comfrey the one you have to be careful with becoming invasive? We have Crimson Clover here I believe or she was in the process of ordering it. I may have to go online.

I always wondered about the compaction, Hempy. Do you never till the dirt even after 5 years? Are worms and compost/mulch enough? 

55 minutes ago, baqualin said:

He's lucky as shit, only lives an hours drive from Build a Soil, Inc. the best LOS supplier on the planet.

Actually, Google maps puts it at 5 hours and 17 minutes. :D I'd love to take a drive out there with a pocket full of money. For real. It would be a beautiful trip, too, going by some of the best mountains.

How are things going with you Baq? Getting damn close, huh? When do you leave? Taking any side trips on the way out? Weather is trying to get better out here. Had a blizzard today west of the front range I believe, but rain most of my area. We're supposed to get a little snow this afternoon or evening but it's too warm so far. 

Give a shout if I can do anything for you.

peace

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Hey MrG. Bocking 14 is the cultivar that is not invasive but comes back every year. It is very easy to root cuttings, and you can split the plant with a shovel to make multiple plants.

 

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Man, talking about geeking out, that Build A Soil site is the place to do it. They have most everything. They're way high priced on some items but great on other stuff and shipping is free I believe. They pretty much tell you how to do it all yourself and I love their philosophy tailored from Coots and Gas.

It's gonna be fun creating the LOS farm here, heh. I'd like to learn it really well and be able to teach others. We have a lot of screwed up earth to recover and might as well start now! 

peace

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No till can be tricky.

By keeping your soil under compost, even straw will keep your soil environment and soil life happy.  This generally means the soil will not be compacted.

Before taking on notill I recommend a bit of soil knowledge.  The following link goes to soil recipes but has soil knowledge towards the end.  

http://culturalhealingandlife.com.www413.your-server.de/index.php?/topic/22-soil-recipe/

After each grow do a quality soil test and adjust nutrition and inputs as appropriate.

 

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Excellent boxes tacman7!! I love them!! I love the green house also!!

When I found my example, it was more a basic lay out for me, it's bit to gingerbread for me, I'm way more Neanderthal than gingerbread, LOL!

3.8% Neanderthal according to the DNA folks!! 

I also have not really considered a greenhouse to cover mine, and I was just going to grow vegetables anyway. No outdoor wacky tobacky outdoors for us, way to many eyes....and the cop shop is a mile + from me.

Again man, great boxes!!

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5 hours ago, Hempyfan said:

No till can be tricky.

By keeping your soil under compost, even straw will keep your soil environment and soil life happy.  This generally means the soil will not be compacted.

Before taking on notill I recommend a bit of soil knowledge.  The following link goes to soil recipes but has soil knowledge towards the end.  

http://culturalhealingandlife.com.www413.your-server.de/index.php?/topic/22-soil-recipe/

After each grow do a quality soil test and adjust nutrition and inputs as appropriate.

 

Thanks Hempy! I did a good bit of reading yesterday and generally getting more comfortable with the ideas. I have one bale of straw right now, and I use that on top of my worm home. It has brown card board and newspaper shredded up for the lower part. I already had some compost going and a garbage can of older growing mix freshened up with EXC, and compost. Then I inoculated it with new microbes. I'll mix that with my compost later on. 

I suppose I'll spend this year getting sites in order, and making more soil. I'd like to re-do the dirt in my raised beds and maybe even relocate them. So, lots of work but lots of learning along the way. Thanks for the link again, Hempy! I have it very first on my list of bookmarks! For now, that page is open and now I have today's reading in front of me! 

peace

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