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tacman7

No Till Raised Bed Methodology

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So I want to quit using pots because I can't do all the lifting to transplant.

I've watched a few vids but not sure exactly what I need to do.

I will build some sort of beds with steel mesh bottoms to sit on the ground in my greenhouse.

Then fill them up and add worms. I plan on skipping Winter grow and make these boxes.

I would then fill them and add worms and let them get working so they would be ready for next Summer.

 

So I only have a general outline of what to do, appreciate help from someone who's used this method etc.

I have last seasons dirt and I would buy some new stuff to add to it.

Ocean Forest?

 

Any help appreciated!

Thanks

 

 

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If your pots are big enough, couldnt you go no till and then without switching to a raised bed not have to pick them up?...  I think one guy here uses 20 gallon rubbermaid totes. Myself I am experimenting with using 7 gallon air pots in place, just amending the soil.  Bout to start my second run in it. 

? maybe i do not understand your problem?

DB

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I like the looks of the raised beds, guess I have to do a lot more reading.

Like in this link taken from the next thread here:

https://www.cannabisfabricpots.com/blog/no-till-cover-cropping-and-top-dressing-with-brownguy420/

They use crimson clover to grow off season to enhance the soil. Going to try that.

 

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Tacman, good vid, thanks. He sure makes it sound pretty simple. Doing it the way nature intended but with a little kick start. 

I have an uncle that's in his mid 80's and uses concrete manhole sleeves for his raised veggie garden. They are 4' tall and 4' in diameter. He owns an engineering company and were left over from a job site. Think he has 6 or 8. They are pretty expensive, so not an option for most of us, but thought it was an amazing idea when I first saw them. Having the soil level at 4 feet high makes for extremely easy gardening for him and his wife. No bending at all, he can pull his side by side right up next to them and use the back as a little work station. He has his drip lines run up from the bottom and works perfect. Anyways, just thought this could spark a few ideas for you. Not sure on your budget, but a fairly inexpensive option is to use sand/earth bags and stack them like bricks to form your beds. This would allow you to get creative with the design. 

Good luck bro, hope it turns out great for you. 

 

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Thanks!

 

Yeah, I think it will work out. I'm going to use old dirt with amendments and grow clover on it this Winter. Along with add earth worms.

I think I should still be able to use General Organics nutrients maybe, at a reduced level maybe. Have to see how that goes.

I've had really good luck with them, no ph' ing with it either.

 

 

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Hey tacman7,

Not sure if helpful but I've been growing in my outdoor raised beds for the last three years with what I think are ok results anyway. I just filled with my natural soil on my block which was pretty high clay content, mixed through a bunch of manure, home made compost and castings, and little bits of whatever else I think I need (this year have added some rock dust to try). The worms also seemed to come naturally when everything was sweet. Never really worry about Ph and mostly just water with straight tap or rain water, sometimes adding seasol and maybe adding very small amounts of liquid food during flowering, and always covered with Hay maybe 80mm which just breaks down beautifully every year. 

I then top them up slightly every season by just adding more of the same if I think they need it. I had a "golden bed" for 2 years, whatever I planted in it went absolutely nuts but it acted and looked a bit depleted this year so have added a bit extra. I would prefer my raised beds were a little higher is all, just for ease of use (less bending over) and because the clay ground is so hard underneath the beds for the roots to penetrate. I probably should have gone a plank more but it's all good. I was actually turning the soil every year previously but am going to try just adding layers from now on.

Cheers

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On 1/1/2019 at 5:44 AM, Halforc said:

I would prefer my raised beds were a little higher is all,

Hey Halforc, I to have been looking into raised beds, how tall are yours now? 

This is what we going to copy, and I'll put my own stank on it, as I can by a lot of vegetables at all the farmers markets for $1900.00 they want for that beauty.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj5aBW2n8xcaNjEw-wEgBhtAPOynIjMU1rZ6Vzu2sD-ftHlCTkyiDPyTHQApDmhxgW86Vof79l0uzek_aD-wT3aUgxmerAK347GiWYKwuO&usqp=CAY

I still have some skins from my pole building to use for the sides. But I think 30" to shallow, and that is why I asked Halforc the depth of his.

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7 hours ago, webeblzr said:

Hey Halforc, I to have been looking into raised beds, how tall are yours now? 

This is what we going to copy, and I'll put my own stank on it, as I can by a lot of vegetables at all the farmers markets for $1900.00 they want for that beauty.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQj5aBW2n8xcaNjEw-wEgBhtAPOynIjMU1rZ6Vzu2sD-ftHlCTkyiDPyTHQApDmhxgW86Vof79l0uzek_aD-wT3aUgxmerAK347GiWYKwuO&usqp=CAY

I still have some skins from my pole building to use for the sides. But I think 30" to shallow, and that is why I asked Halforc the depth of his.

Hey webeblzr sorry mate I couldn't see your photo, probably a problem with my computer.

Basically mine are pretty short mate, probably only in the 12 to 20 inch range, but they are also floorless which allows the roots to penetrate deeper into the earth anyway if they'd like to. One of the reasons that they are short is because the taller they are, the higher my plants will be, and I have some 'issues' around here so I don't need them poking above my fence lol!

The other dimensions of the beds are about 3 to 4 foot in width and maybe 4 to 8ft in length, depending on the bed and I've grown some pretty big girls in them, to my standards anyway haha. The biggest being maybe a 9 ft sleestack and some biggish SugarPunch in the 8 ft range. I always bend the big girls over and pin them to reduce height too. Just beautiful plants though. I also have an old enamelled steel bath which I use as another bed which works great! 

In my limited experience, i think your 30 inch beds will be plenty deep enough, and definitely a good height for tending the girls and I reckon they will absolutely love all of that space to spread their roots!

Hope that helps a little anyway bro.

Cheers

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Hey Halforc,  Thank you for replying. I'll be using this for my vegetable garden, since I do not like live in a free state. I got to keep the ladies in the the dark, in unseen places. 

When I saw this garden for sale, I loved the idea, but it's way out of my price range. The wife and I are getting to the age, if we can garden upright, we will be doing it longer. Last year to so, we let the weeds get away from us, so looking at raised beds. 

We have deer like many places got rabbits, so the fence above is needed for that and vine running plants.

Thanks again.

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yup, i definitely need to move my girls into dark, unseen places too... I just love growing under the sun, but not nice always looking over shoulder. Cheers mate, I try to grow a lot of herbs and veggies too.

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