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gardenartus

You Can Now Compost Your Loved Ones, Rather Than Bury Them in a Coffin, in Washington State

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Just stick me under a cannabis plant or two lol. Wow, can you imagine burying your loved one in your back yard, and compost them! lol

https://returntonow.net/2019/05/12/you-can-now-compost-your-loved-ones-rather-than-bury-them-in-a-coffin-in-washington-state/?fbclid=IwAR0pDrujybqAcGFkln3T0XDBKww_Qc7FAnvy5cXvtZjxoiI707ITRD9x6es

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Damn that’s a bit different lol:j

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Fred West and his wife Rose were doing that before it was cool..............

Though the pair of them were sick, murdering bastards, though!! :execute

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As expected, the governor signed the bill into law.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/washington-becomes-first-state-to-legalize-human-composting/

The new law, which takes effect May 1, 2020, recognizes “natural organic reduction” and alkaline hydrolysis (sometimes called “liquid cremation”) as acceptable means of disposition for human bodies. Until now, Washington code had permitted only burial and cremation.

The [organic reduction] process, which involves using wood chips, straw and other materials, takes approximately four weeks and is related to methods of “livestock composting” which ranchers and farmers have been using for several years. Lynne Carpenter-Boggs, a soil scientist at Washington State University, says that practice can turn a 1,500-pound steer — bones and all — into clean, odorless soil in a matter of months.

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1 hour ago, ledfoot said:

As expected, the governor signed the bill into law.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/washington-becomes-first-state-to-legalize-human-composting/

The new law, which takes effect May 1, 2020, recognizes “natural organic reduction” and alkaline hydrolysis (sometimes called “liquid cremation”) as acceptable means of disposition for human bodies. Until now, Washington code had permitted only burial and cremation.

The [organic reduction] process, which involves using wood chips, straw and other materials, takes approximately four weeks and is related to methods of “livestock composting” which ranchers and farmers have been using for several years. Lynne Carpenter-Boggs, a soil scientist at Washington State University, says that practice can turn a 1,500-pound steer — bones and all — into clean, odorless soil in a matter of months.

So now we will be buried in the back 40, in compost lol. Well I guess it is better for the earth. That is pretty amazing how fast a body decomposes to nothing.

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"The back 40" LOL, my mom's and dad's ashes are spread in the woods at the edge of the back forty of the farm my Danish immigrant great-grandparents bought from the original homesteaders.  I'm sure they would have been fine with being composted (but getting dug up by hungry coyotes or bears might be a bit macabre).

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/back_forty

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That is actually pretty cool, I would not mind being composted in the woods lol But no bears eat me please lol

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